Overview

Embrace the role of change-maker in the financial technology (fintech) sphere. The Bachelor of Business Administration with a major in Financial Technology and Innovation blends the robust foundation of a business administration degree with a cutting-edge financial technology curriculum.  

You’ll gain solid business acumen while learning how to leverage fintech to spur business growth and adapt to the rapidly shifting technological world. The curriculum is designed to enhance your adaptability and instill a growth mindset. 

In this program, you will learn:  

  • data analytics, including how to examine, clean, transform, and model data to discover useful information and support decision-making using systems and software to gather insights from patterns and correlations in large datasets
  • to use design thinking, a human-centred approach to problem-solving that involves prototyping and testing to develop innovative solutions
  • about solution architecture and how to create digital financial products and solutions that meet market needs and regulatory requirements
  • current trends in fintech, how the finance world is leveraging technology from blockchain to AI, and how fintech is expanding into everyday consumer experiences. 

This program features small classroom settings that foster cooperative learning, guided by faculty members who bring real-life experiences to your courses. We use a collaborative project-based approach, allowing you to hone key professional skills such as leadership, teamwork, critical analysis, strategic decision-making, problem-solving, and effective communication. 

You will begin the program with a common first year with Bachelor of Business Administration students from all majors to build a comprehensive business knowledge foundation before branching into your fintech major in year two.  

Minors

Opportunities for additional specialization are available through the following optional minors.

Construction Project Management: A pathway to business roles in Canada’s booming construction sector, focusing on managing significant capital projects, addressing design, risk, and conflict management. 

Energy, Oil and Gas: A curriculum designed to prepare you for Alberta’s energetic and changing energy landscape, with courses on technical, regulatory, and economic aspects from the renowned MacPhail School of Energy. 

Connected to industry 

Our close ties with industry leaders ensure your educational journey is practical and relevant. Our connection to the business community enriches your academic experience with a pragmatic perspective, preparing you for the realities of the industry. 

Your program culminates in an integrated work experience where you’ll sharpen your critical thinking, creativity, and collaborative skills in a real-world business setting. 

Upon graduation, you will have comprehensive business acumen and a specialized financial technology and innovation skill set. This major positions you at the forefront of a rapidly evolving job market, where expertise in cutting-edge financial technology is increasingly critical for businesses to innovate, remain competitive, and meet the digital demands of modern finance. 

Those working in fintech tend to be innovative, methodical, and directive.  

You need:  

  • to be highly logical to analyze complex problems and create solutions  
  • patience and persistence  
  • attention to details  
  • knowledge of user experience  
  • numeracy skills  
  • the ability to explain complex ideas in plain language  
  • to be organized  
  • the ability to work under pressure and manage your time.  

You should enjoy learning new computer languages and programming styles, creative problem-solving, and working with others. 

Those who have previously completed the SAIT Accounting, Business and Entrepreneurship, Community Economic Development, Management and Leadership, or Marketing certificates can receive course credit for classes. The number of applicable credits will vary by certificate. 

Graduates of the SAIT Business Administration diploma may be eligible to enter this program with advanced standing and earn their bachelor’s degree with a further three years of study.  

During your fourth year (with at least 90 credits complete), you’ll participate in a practicum or capstone project as part of the program. 

If you choose a practicum, you’ll work with a business or organization to reflect, research, analyze, evaluate and recommend solutions to real-world problems, showcasing your skills to prospective employers. You’ll be responsible for finding employment for this practicum, which must be approved. 

If you choose a capstone project, you’ll work individually or as part of a project team on a series of activities and simulations drawn from multiple disciplines to create a strategic and operating business start-up plan.  

Upon successful completion of this program, you’ll receive a SAIT Bachelor of Business Administration degree with a major in Financial Technology and Innovation. 

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Careers and opportunities

Each year, SAIT conducts a survey between February and April to determine the employment rate, salary and satisfaction of our newest SAIT alumni. 

people icon94% graduate employment rate*

salary icon $60,000 average starting salary*

Find out more about our graduate employment statistics >

*Results for Bachelor of Business Administration graduates from all majors.

Our graduates may work in the following occupations. Some careers require additional experience and education.

Associated National Occupational Classification (NOC) codes: 10010, 10020, 10021, 11101, 20010, 20012.

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Career counselling and support

Unsure which career path is for you? SAIT offers career planning services to help you decide your future.

You can also get started by taking our online career finder quiz, which can help you narrow down your search based on your current skills and interests.

Finally, you can also head to Alberta alis for various tools and resources, including additional quizzes and labour market information to help you narrow down a career path.

Courses

The Bachelor of Business Administration requires 120 credits (39 courses) for completion, including at least 72 credits at the senior level. All courses are three credits except for the six-credit integrative experience.

The program consists of:

  • Business core courses - 45 credits (14 courses)
  • Complementary core courses - 18 credits (6 courses)
  • Complementary elective courses - 12 credits (4 courses)
  • Major courses - 45 credits (15 courses)
  • Optional minor - 12 credits (4 courses)

The first semester is common for all majors. Students declare a major in their second semester, subject to a competitive screening process, and move into open registration.

View suggested classes for your first year

You must take all of the following courses to complete this program.

Business junior core

Course Credits

This course provides an introduction to financial accounting from the perspective of the user who makes decisions based on financial information. The course includes an introduction to the accounting framework, generally accepted accounting principles and financial statements. Accounting concepts such as accounting for cash, accounts receivable, assets, liabilities, sales and inventories, are covered in the context of how they are applied to decision making. Decision analysis regarding corporate ownership and application of financial ratios will also be studied.

Equivalents:
  • ACCT 215
3

The use of industry-standard software is essential to effectively manage the information technologies that are required in business and online environments today. In this course, you will demonstrate skills in managing and customizing the Windows environment as well as effectively using internet resources to enhance business productivity. You will develop skills in creating professional documents, managing data using spreadsheets and using technology for effective presentations. Through hands-on applications, you will learn to use productivity tools and application software in various business situations, and be able to select the right tool for the business need.

Equivalents:
  • BCMP 225
3

Business Mathematics introduces you to mathematical techniques used to solve finance problems involving simple and compound interest, debt repayment, valuation of investments, simple and general annuities, amortization of debts, sinking funds and bond valuations.

Equivalents:
  • BMAT 205
  • BMAT 230
3

In this introductory course in Microeconomics, you will learn about economic principles involved in analyzing problems in the business and consumer sectors of the Canadian economy. Some of the topics covered are: economic scarcity, demand, supply, elasticity, and perfect and imperfect competition.

Equivalents:
  • ECON 250
3

Macroeconomics introduces you to the operation of the Canadian economy. You will apply economic principles to analyze a national economy. Topics include measuring and analyzing demand and supply, economic performance, and unemployment and inflation; As well, government fiscal, trade, and monetary policies are explored.

Equivalents:
  • ECON 305
3

Marketing Essentials is an introductory course offering you a solid foundation in marketing principles. Working individually and in teams, you will research and discover how marketing decisions are made and identify the components of sustainable marketing programs. Your research, content application and teamwork skills will be developed and reinforced as you progress through the course.

Equivalents:
  • MKTG 260
3

The Introduction to Business course will provide you with tools to understand multiple business functions including management, human resources, marketing, operations, and personal finance. You will also explore the Canadian Business and economic system, as well as the importance of business ethics and social responsibility in an increasingly global environment. Working through a team project and business simulation, you will begin to develop a 21st-century skillset, including communication, critical thinking, collaboration, and effective teamwork. By the end of this course, you should have the foundations for understanding business and business ownership in Canada.

Equivalents:
  • MNGT 200
3

Business senior core

Course Credits

Business Law outlines the Canadian legal system in the context of a business environment and empowers students to apply the law and make informed decisions concerning their legal affairs. Emphasis is placed on the construction of the judicial system, the resolution of disputes, tort law, contract law, business structures, and employment law. These legal principles are applied to personal and business scenarios. Upon completion, students will have an understanding of when to seek legal advice.

Equivalents:
  • BLAW 300
3

This introductory course provides an overview of human behaviour in organizations at the individual, group, and organizational level and the effect of each on organizational effectiveness. Topics include: individual differences, motivation, communication, teams, power and politics, conflict and negotiation, leadership, organizational culture, and change management.

Equivalents:
  • MNGT 250
3

In this course, you will focus on the impact that international business has on the operation and strategic decisions of Canadian firms. You will be introduced to the threats and opportunities of globalization, international competition and regional integration. This course also includes traditional topics in international business, such as studies of the global environment, theory of international trade and investment, currency markets and modes of entry, as well as emerging issues of global value chains, gated globalization, and changing world order.

Pre-requisites:
  • ECON 1110
Equivalents:
  • MNGT 360
3

In this integrative course you will focus on the interrelationship of competitive strategy with the external environment, internal capabilities, resources, organization, management preferences, and social responsibilities. Use of the case study methodology and application of analytical tools will be utilized to develop integrative and strategic thinking skills. The Capstone Course in the BBA program will build on the concepts learned in this class.

Pre-requisites:

One of:

  • ACCT 2010
  • ACCT 2020

One of:

  • BFIN 2301
  • FNCE 3060
Equivalents:
  • MNGT 405
3

Junior complementary core

Course Credits

Communication and Presentation Skills provides you with the foundational knowledge and skills needed to compose business documents and give engaging, formal presentations. You will learn how to effectively communicate in a professional environment and consider different aspects of spoken, written and nonverbal communication (e.g., channel, content, organization, style, tone, format and mechanics) in order to share clear and concise messages with your audience. You will be required to work in both individual and collaborative settings.

Equivalents:
  • COMN 220
  • COMM 1030
3

The purpose of this course is to introduce you to fundamental skills in critical thinking. You will develop skills in identifying fallacies, evaluating formal arguments, and diagnosing the appropriate form of argumentation in a variety of areas, including science and morality. Your skills in argumentation will be honed both in evaluating others’ arguments and in making your own.

Equivalents:
  • PHIL 241
3

Quantitative Methods will build analysis skills through the study of basic concepts in statistics, including: sampling; measurement of central tendency and variability; probability and probability distributions; random variables; estimation; hypothesis testing; small sample theory; analysis of variance; linear programming; and regression analysis.

Equivalents:
  • STAT 220
  • STAT 270
3

Senior complementary core

Course Credits

Entering the work force and succeeding in the workplace is strongly influenced by one’s ability to present information verbally, whether the intention is to inform, persuade, or influence. Building on communication concepts and skills learned earlier in the program, in this course you will continue to hone your presentation skills and develop your personal style to ensure you can meet the expectations of employers, clients, and other stakeholders in a variety of business contexts.

Corequsites:

One of: 

  • COMN 220
  • COMM 1070
3

The philosophical study of morality - ethics - provides a foundation upon which laws and definitions of acceptable behaviour are built. Understanding the theory and application of ethical reasoning provides insight into the functioning and differences between societies. This comprehensive introduction to ethics will provide an overview of the major ethical schools of thought and their application to a diverse range of contemporary ethical questions.

3

Research Methodologies introduces you to the scientific method and its application in the research process. You will explore topics such as literature review, hypothesis formulation, research design, quantitative and qualitative data collection and analysis, referencing, research report writing, and peer review. You will develop an ability to conduct research in an ethical and thorough manner using appropriate research strategies, and to critically assess the reliability and validity of common research tools.

3

Financial technology and innovation

Course Credits

Managers in all areas of business require an understanding of financial statements and how to use financial information for decision making. In this course, you will gain expertise in interpreting balance sheets, income statements and statements of cash flow. You will also learn how to use financial information for decision making. You will perform variance analysis and ratio analysis on financial statements in order to analyze them. You will gain an understanding of the importance of cash management in a business, and subsequently prepare bank reconciliations in order to reconcile cash between accounting records and bank statements. In addition, you will develop an understanding of the budgeting process, and how a budget is used in planning and control. Using the appropriate software, you will create a budget. The concept of using incremental analysis to make decisions will be introduced. Lastly, risk will be discussed for each objective of the course.

Pre-requisites:
  • ACCT 1010
  • BMAT 1040
Equivalents:
  • ACCT 2020
  • ACCT 338
  • ACCT 225
3

This is an introductory course in business finance with an emphasis on improving financial performance from a management perspective. You will study the various elements that impact financial planning, risk management and management decision making. From a variety of business function perspectives, financial elements including capital financing, debt vs equity, working capital and leasing will be studied. An overall analysis of financial statements, corporate structure, and capital budgeting are also included.

Pre-requisites:
  • ACCT 1010
  • BMAT 1040
Equivalents:
  • BFIN 301
3

This course explores the use of computer programming languages as tools that can be used to provide IT business solutions. You’ll explore the evolution of computer programming and examine common problem solving techniques. You’ll also examine code reuse in functions, scoping and abstraction. The course includes an introduction to version control, and you’ll use classes and object-oriented programming principles to create applications using an industry-standard programming language.

Equivalents:
  • CPRG 216
3

This course aims to equip students with essential data manipulation and modeling techniques. It explores various data formats and styles, enabling students to understand data extraction, transformation and loading the datasets. Students will learn to refine and query data from the databases using query language. Through the lens of data analysis, students will craft informative narratives to aid organizational decision-making.

Pre-requisites:
  • Completion of 60 credits in the Bachelor of Business Administration program.
Equivalents:
  • DATA 401
3

Introduces the use of data to meet the needs of an organization and apply data in decision making. Understand a balanced approach to integrating data decisions in business processes and strategic alignment.

Pre-requisites:
  • Completion of 60 credits
Equivalents:
  • DATA 410
3

Design Thinking involves processes and tools used to create, develop and test new ideas. It facilitates innovation and creativity while de-risking the process of creativity. This course introduces you to the design thinking processes and toolkits. The course will cover the identification and definition of business challenges. You will learn how to create human-centric strategies, products and services for your customers. Identification of your customers’ social, emotional, and physical needs will be a critical component. The ideation process will focus on creating, developing, and testing the solutions you make. You will address real-world challenges and present solutions to your stakeholders.

Pre-requisites:
  • ACCT 1010
  • MNGT 1200
Corequsites:
  • MKTG 1060
Equivalents:
  • ENTI 300
3

This course introduces core concepts and terms associated with financial technology and innovation. An overview of the FinTech ecosystem and finance value chain are included. Additional topics will be added to this description during development.

3

This course will explore the current regulatory environment, accepted standards, and ethical implications associated with finance, technology, and FinTech sectors. The disruptive nature of a range of technologies will be considered and their impact on future regulations, standards, and overall directions will be discussed.

3

Solution architecture is the process of designing, describing, and developing solutions matched with specific business requirements. In this course, students will learn processes and best practices for architecting technology-based solutions. Topics will include systems thinking, user-centric design and modelling.

3

This course in Artificial Intelligence in Business is designed to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of AI technologies and how they can be leveraged in various business contexts. The course covers a range of topics, including the basics of AI, natural language processing, computer vision, machine learning, and deep learning. Students will learn how these technologies are being used in business environments to automate routine tasks, extract insights from large volumes of data, and develop predictive models to inform decision-making. Additionally, the course will examine ethical considerations related to AI, such as privacy, transparency, and bias. Throughout the course, students will engage in hands-on activities and projects designed to reinforce their understanding of AI and its applications in business. They will also explore real-world case studies in the field of AI. Upon completion of this course, students will have gained a strong foundation in AI and be equipped with the knowledge and skills to develop and implement AI-based solutions to solve business problems.

Pre-requisites:
  • CPRG 2160
  • FTEC 1010
  • MNGT 1200
3

This adaptive course allows students to explore new products, concepts and trends impacting the FinTech ecosystem. Students will be guided through various approaches and frameworks for scanning and tracking trends. Working in teams, students will dive deep into an area of interest, presenting their findings to collectively build an understanding of emerging and anticipated trends, supporting their readiness for and effectiveness in joining this evolving industry.

3

Business Leadership is a course that will take you on a journey of self discovery as well as an inside look at current perspectives of Leadership today. We all take on leadership roles in our lives. In business, success is often attributed to great leadership. However, today in business this role has evolved as has the business environment. Team work is an essential component of an organization’s efficiency and effectiveness. From time to time you may be called upon to take on a leadership role for your work group, even without a title. Throughout this course you will gain the knowledge and skills to help you fulfill your role as a leader through your understanding of personal and organizational leadership.

Pre-requisites:

One of: 

  • MNGT 2250
  • MGMT 2050
  • MGMT 230
  • MGMT 3030
  • MNGT 250
  • LDSH 310
Equivalents:
  • LDSH 360
  • LDSH 405
3

In this course, you will work with a team to develop products that solve real-world problems. Topics include the product development life cycle, including product discovery, prototyping and testing. You’ll also examine market analysis and user needs, as well as explore the vision and strategy, analytics and leadership tools required to build and launch innovative products.

Pre-requisites:
  • MNGT 1200
  • COMM 1070
3

In Operations Management, students will explore such topics as capacity planning; process and labour design; Total Quality Management (TQM); and inventory models within the operational environment of both manufacturing and service organizations. This course will broaden your knowledge of best practices, and provide you with a framework for evaluating existing processes and recommending improvements at all levels of an organization.

Pre-requisites:

One of: 

  • MNGT 2250
  • MGMT 2050
  • MGMT 3030
  • STAT 2040
Equivalents:
  • MNGT 407
3

You will choose courses from the following lists.

SAIT BA graduates from some majors may be eligible to use ACWE 300 - Business Diploma Integrative Experience Capstone or MNGT 395 - Managing Strategically as a financial technology and innovation senior business elective.

Business core integrative experience (choose one)

Course Credits

In this course, students will synthesize the academic learning acquired over the course of their BBA degree program with hands on experience in industry. Through a series of projects that draw from the various disciplines within the program, students will have an opportunity to reflect, research, analyze, evaluate, and recommend solutions to real world business problems within an existing business. In so doing, students will have an opportunity to showcase their achievement of the BBA program outcomes. Students are responsible for securing their own employment, which must be approved by the Academic Chair.

Equivalents:
  • MNGT 4990
6

This course integrates and further develops the Program Outcomes of the BBA program. Students will work individually and collaboratively on a series of activities and simulations which draw from the multiple disciplines within the program to research, analyze, evaluate, and recommend solutions to business problems. The program culminates in the completion of a strategic and operating business start-up plan.

Pre-requisites:
  • STAT 4010

One of: 

  • MNGT 4050
  • MGMT 4050
6

Junior science elective (choose one)

Course Credits

From the smallest cell to the largest animal, this course examines the diversity and complexity of life as we know it on Earth. Using a phyletic classification system, you will learn about the similarities and differences that unite all life on this planet. You will trace the human lineage and learn about your shared heritage with the simplest of organisms. The relationships between taxonomic groups will be emphasized, and the characteristics that allow organisms to thrive in their ecosystems will also be explored using Darwinian evolution.

3

This course provides an introduction to the scientific process and the disciplines involved in understanding our global environment. The course will explore our human impacts on the earth’s atmosphere, water, soil and biotic systems. Throughout the course, students will have the opportunity to identify sustainable options to reduce our collective impact on the global environment. At the completion of the course students will be able to explain how human activities cause impacts to the environment and the changes required to move toward environmental sustainability.

3

In this course, you will examine the physiological and psychological aspects of health and wellness. Topics include physical fitness, musculoskeletal health and cardiorespiratory health; nutrition and weight management; mental health and stress management; infectious and chronic diseases; the effects of consumerism on health and health care; and the promotion of healthy lifestyles and healthy aging.

3

This course will give you a broad and first-hand experience of science. The goal is to explore the scientific method, the techniques through which it establishes its reliability, and current trends which suggest the shape that future science will take. In this course you will increase your awareness of science’s growing influence on how we understand the world, as well as how science’s history and underlying philosophical assumptions are essential to understanding why it is so successful.

3

Junior humanities elective (choose one)

Course Credits

The History of Architecture course introduces you to the chronological development of architecture from prehistory to Egyptian, Greek, Byzantine, Early Christian, Gothic, Renaissance, Baroque, Industrial and Modern eras, highlighting the development of structural systems, materials, construction and other building systems. You will focus on developing an understanding of material use, styles of architecture and an appreciation of the unique architectural legacies of various cultures.

3

Critical Reading and Writing students explore a variety of literary and visual texts, and demonstrate an understanding of literature, primary and secondary material, and referencing techniques. Development and demonstration of skills in comprehension and critical analysis in written and oral assignments are required.

3

HUMN 2010 - Introduction to Humanities - offers insight into people and culture. We explore the artistic and philosophical legacies that have shaped our perspective as a contemporary society. We consider art, literature and music through an historical lens and interdisciplinary approach to understand how humanity has been molded. The emphasis will be on analysis and discussion of the concepts, critical reading of the texts, and persuasive writing and oral presentations of your ideas.

3

Ethics in Technology provides an introduction to ethical theory as it applies to the assessment of current issues related to advancing information technology. Issues covered include intellectual property, network security and privacy focusing on ethical issues in both the fundamental problems and the approaches to mitigate or solve them.

3

Through readings, writing, discussion and analysis in this course, you will compare the thinking of some influential philosophers on topics such as knowledge, existence, the mind and morality with your own views. You will learn to formulate arguments and theories, examine them critically, and come to a better understanding of your own beliefs and their justification. You will also be better equipped to analyze and judge the theories of others, especially those of the philosophers studied in this course.

3

Junior social sciences elective (choose one)

Course Credits

The focal point of Indigenous Studies is the wealth and diverse nature of Indigenous histories, languages and cultures, as well as contemporary challenges and opportunities. The course is intended to provide a conceptual framework that all learners can use to enhance their understanding of the Indigenous cultures in Canada.

3

Introduction to Psychology introduces you to a variety of scientific approaches to the understanding of human behaviour. This course will challenge you to think critically about actions and decisions that involve assertions or underlying assumptions about human nature. The concepts studied in the course are applicable to both your personal life and to the workplace.

3

Introduction to Sociology will introduce learners to the study of society from a sociological perspective. Participants will consider social processes such as power and agency as well concepts of the individual, the family, and groups including community, culture, and work environments.

3

Using a multi-disciplinary approach, students will explore and examine popular culture as one of the most significant cultural and social agents in contemporary society. Learners will study the emergence of pop culture research and a range of diverse theoretical approaches including critical studies of gender, sexuality and race. Students will consider a variety of mediums such as music, video games, social media, art, film/television, fashion and celebrity. Finally, learners will study and reflect on the role of popular culture in the development of individual identity and group/community identity and action.

3

Senior complementary elective (choose one)

Course Credits

This course will examine intercultural communication and its relationship to personal, organizational and societal identity and influence. The ability to communicate with people from diverse cultures will promote increased understanding of cultural differences, challenge perceptions and develop tolerance for differences. Developing intercultural communication skills will enable you to work successfully and collaboratively in a global marketplace.

Equivalents:
  • COMM 300
3

Participants in this course will explore types of creative nonfiction (CNF), examining its history and development while recognizing its role in improving understanding of individual and cultural experiences. Students will also discuss using storytelling in the workplace and writing creative nonfiction as a means of empowerment.

3

Through critical reading, written responses, class discussion, and academic research of literary texts, you will develop an awareness of the form and content of short stories and novels from various world regions. You will also develop an appreciation of world literature and the historical, social, and cultural context in which the texts were created.

Pre-requisites:

One of: 

  • COMN 220
  • COMM 1070
3

In the 21st century, creative and innovative thought are essential skills. Creativity isn’t an innate ability that only artists are born with. Creativity and innovation are skills that can be learned and developed. In this course, participants will form an appreciation and understanding of creativity as a genre worthy of academic study. We will think about generative thought and the expression of emotion as part of the creative process. We will discuss the importance of taking risks and making mistakes as vital to innovative thought. We will consider the behaviors, techniques, and practical tools that students can use to nurture creativity and innovation. Learners from all disciplines will gain an understanding of how to integrate the processes of creativity and innovation into their professional and personal lives.

3

This course will explore and highlight how cryptography is used to securely authenticate individuals & devices, and transmit personal, financial & institutional data securely over various public domains. 

Cryptography helps us secure our digital technologies using fundamental mathematical functions and allows only those intended to access and modify encrypted information.

Without cryptography our modern world would not be possible. If all cryptographic schemes stopped working for a day, our banking system would collapse, internet traffic would come to a halt and communication devices would no longer function.

3

This course is a philosophical exploration of the nature and role of money in shaping our lives, our understanding of the world, and our lived experiences. After examining the history of money from its early forms as commodities to modern incarnations like cryptocurrency, we will look at how it is used and how it affects how people understand both the world around them and their own identity. We take up a philosophical lens to identify the metaphysical and ethical implications of what we do with money, and a monetary lens to look at philosophy and expand our understanding of what it means to exist and how our interactions using money shape our perceptions of ourselves, others, and the things that we value.

Pre-requisites:

One of: 

  • PHIL 241
  • PHIL 1011
3

The advancement of science and technology depends in a large part on the priorities and ambitions of society. By the same token scientific discoveries and the introduction of new technologies can have an impact on social structures and values. The complex interrelationship between these two forces will be explored in detail providing learners with the context to understand and evaluate our technologically-based society and the directions it might take.

3

In this course, you will examine the history of the Canadian workplace as well as contemporary issues that involve job satisfaction and alienation. You will study both Canadian and global employment trends. Business and political influences on the workforce, including technology use, labour laws, trade unions, and employment equity will also be explored.

Pre-requisites:

One of: 

  • SOCI 2010
  • SOCI 2020
3

Do you consider yourself a conformist or a deviant? Is one better than the other? Why? The circumstances in which you adhere to or ignore standards of socially-acceptable behaviour are complex and dynamic. In this course, you will investigate these situations by focusing on the workplace. You will examine the effects, both positive and negative, of conforming and divergent behaviour; learn how marginalizing factors such as gender, ethnicity, and disability relate to these behaviours; and analyze when and why it is important to comply with or challenge established norms.

Pre-requisites:

One of: 

  • SOCI 2010
  • SOCI 2020
3

Financial technology and innovation (choose two)

Course Credits

Money and Banking introduces the sources and demands for money, interest rates, and financial products and services. You will discuss financial markets, the roles of financial and non-financial institutions, financial institution management, the structure and governance of the international financial system, the roles of central banks, and current trends within the Canadian financial services sector.

Equivalents:
  • BFIN 333
3

Building on the Design Thinking and Innovation course, in this workshop-driven course, students will examine the definition and importance of innovation in organizations. They will identify and evaluate potential sources of new ideas, and learn how to prioritize and select innovation projects based on their potential value and feasibility. Students will also be introduced to innovation management frameworks and learn how to both recognize and manage common barriers to innovation. The course will explore the tools and techniques for managing innovation projects, and examine the role of leadership and organizational culture in fostering innovation. Additionally, students will learn how to manage a diverse portfolio of innovation initiatives.

Pre-requisites:
  • ENTI 2300
3

This course will explore open and emerging technologies actively disrupting or transforming core business functions and processes. Topics may include blockchain, cryptocurrency, data, Web 3.0, sustainability, and others. The course will examine these topics and discuss the current and future impacts on the world of business.

3

To help bridge the gap between business problems and technology solutions, building on the Solutions Architecture course, advanced solution architecture will extend this learning into how one might outline the requirements, features and development phases of a particular solution. This would include an awareness of how specs may be defined, managed and delivered, and insight into the world of DevOps. It will cover the solution architecture fundamentals, concepts, and techniques by focusing on a variety of architecture design patterns, common frameworks, and the most used methodologies that aid in architecting a FinTech solution. Students will explore aspects of design and implementation from both technology domains/platforms and business strategy perspectives; to transform business requirements into implementable artifacts.

Pre-requisites:
  • FTEC 1010
  • FTEC 3020
3

This course introduces you to the fundamental concepts in cyber security, including cyber risk management, host and network security, identification and access control, cryptography and organizational security. This course is mapped to the CompTIA Security+ industry certification: SY0-601, a globally recognized entry-level certification for many cyber security jobs. During lectures, activities and labs you’ll cover topics including attacks, threats and vulnerabilities, as well as architecture and design, operations and incident response (IR), and implementation. The course concludes with an examination of governance, risk management and compliance (GRC).

Equivalents:
  • ITSC 410
3

Financial technology and innovation senior business electives (choose one)

Course Credits

This course covers sources and structures of income tax legislation, the meaning of income from employment, net income for individuals, income from business and property, capital cost allowance, capital gains/losses, remuneration salaries vs. dividends, impact of taxation on business decisions and tax planning.

Pre-requisites:

One of: 

  • ACCT 2110
  • BFIN 1255
  • BLAW 2030
Equivalents:
  • ACCT 375
3

This course provides students with a basic understanding of the structure of both the Canadian and the Alberta legal systems. Topics include copyright, intellectual property, contract, evidence collection, and privacy law and their effect on security professionals. The application of the law will be contrasted with ethical guidelines that are enforced on security practitioners.

Pre-requisites:
  • BLAW 2030
Equivalents:
  • BLAW 301
3

Using statistical techniques to arrange, extract, transform and load the datasets to gain insight from data. Students will learn diverse range of statistical methods, and analyzing datasets with the purpose of effectively conveying information to business decision-makers.

Pre-requisites:
  • Completion of 60 credits
Equivalents:
  • DATA 415
3

This course aims to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of data analysis principles and methods, employing widely recognized industry tools and techniques. students will gain the skills to proficiently utilize data analysis tools and deliver refined insights by engaging in hands-on exercises and using industry standard analytical tools, to inform decision-makers.

Pre-requisites:
  • Completion of 60 credits
Equivalents:
  • DATA 445
3

Economic development is the process of increasing prosperity within a community or region. This course provides an overview of the field of economic development and the roles of economic development professionals. The course examines the assessment of community advantages and disadvantages, economic development planning, funding of economic development projects and implementation strategies. Throughout the course, the student will develop an economic development plan for a case study community.

Equivalents:
  • ECON 355
3

In today’s fast-changing global business environment, an understanding of the legal requirements in human resources is critical for HR professionals to ensure a productive and positive work place. Employment Law provides a thorough understanding of laws, regulations and standards applicable to the HR field through case studies and analysis. Emphasis is placed on employment standards, privacy and human rights legislation. An overview of labour relations and Occupational Health and Safety is also addressed.

Equivalents:
  • ELAW 350
3

Entrepreneurship is a course offering you insights and experience into the dynamic environment of entrepreneurial thinking and innovation. Working individually through guided content and discoveries, you will evaluate yourself and case studies to identify mindset and career opportunities. In teams, you will work through the development and presentation of an applied business plan to explore the many integrated facets of business in entrepreneurial ventures. Your research, self discovery, application and collaboration skills will be developed and reinforced as you progress through the journey of entrepreneurship and innovation.

Pre-requisites:
  • ACCT 1010
  • MKTG 1060
Equivalents:
  • ENTR 350
3

This course provides an overview of all activities related to recruitment and selection of employees. Topics include: an in-depth approach in studying job analysis, job design, recruitment activities, selection processes, performance management, and the application of human resources metrics throughout each step. A focus on the behavioral approach to identifying job specific competencies, crafting behavioral interview questions and conducting interviews are integral parts of this course. Successful completion of this course will provide you with the tools necessary to successfully support recruitment and selection processes, while also considering aspects of retaining an engaged workforce.

Pre-requisites:

One of: 

  • HRMT 2320
  • MNGT 4040
Equivalents:
  • HRMT 300
3

Human Resource (HR) Management includes the foundational knowledge and skills required by HR Professionals and business managers. This course includes an overview of the field of human resource management, along with human resource planning, employee compensation and benefits, recruitment, selection and training of employees, performance management, government regulation and health and safety in the workplace.

Equivalents:
  • HRMT 320

Precluded Equivalents

  • CPMT 3040
3

This course has two parts. In Part A, you will learn the importance of HRIS (Human Resource Information Systems) and leveraging HRIS to improve the effectiveness of HR administration, Talent Management and Planning, Recruitment and Selection, Training and Development, and Rewarding. It also focuses on the importance of new technological trends like Artificial intelligence, Social Media and Mobile devices in HR processes. Topics include Systems considerations and design of HRIS, Change Management and Implementation of HRIS, Justifying HRIS investment, and HRIS in different areas of HR. Part B covers HR Metrics and Analytics, Data Visualization, Data Analytics and Data-driven decision-making in HR.

Pre-requisites:

One of: 

  • HRMT 2320
  • MNGT 4040
Equivalents:
  • HRMT 350
3

This course provides an overview of all activities related to workplace training, employee development and organizational learning. Topics include an in-depth exploration of adult learning principles; training design; metrics associated with return on investment and employee learning; health and wellness initiatives; and career development. A focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of training programs are also integral parts of this course. Successful completion of this course will provide you with the tools necessary to create and support employee training programs, while simultaneously incorporating other aspects of talent management in retaining an engaged workforce.

Pre-requisites:

One of: 

  • HRMT 2320
  • MNGT 4040
Equivalents:
  • HRMT 360
3

In this course, you will be immersed in the dynamic field of workplace health, safety and wellness. Topics covered include legislation and regulatory compliance; common health and safety practices; ergonomics; worker accommodation; employee assistance programs (EAP); worker protection programs; and stress management. Using an integrated approach, you will gain an understanding of the importance of establishing and maintaining an effective workplace health, safety and wellness (both physical and psychological) program as a key aspect of strategic human resource planning and development.

3

Talent Management III: Total Rewards provides an overview of best practices in talent management with a focus on compensation and benefits. Topics include components of compensation; salary benchmarking; salary reviews; variable pay options; job evaluation; employee benefits; financial and non-financial rewards; and the performance management cycle. Successful completion of this course will give you the tools necessary to design and manage a total compensation program, while also exploring the application of human resources metrics in employee programs.

Pre-requisites:
  • HRMT 2300
  • HRMT 2360
3

In this course, you will gain an understanding of the different issues and legislation affecting the employment relationship in the public and private sectors in Canada, as well as the role that trade unions play in the workplace. Topics include: the economic and political environment; the history of the labour movement; union organization; certification; collective agreements and administration; negotiation; dispute resolution; and third-party assistance. The focus is on the practical implications of this knowledge for the HR specialist.

3

This course gives you an overview of all the activities related to creating a future-oriented process of developing and implementing Human Resources (HR) programs that address and solve business issues and contributes to the long-term success of an organization. You’ll come away with an in-depth understanding of what strategic HR Management is, how it aligns with both HR practices and the goals of the organization, the nuances of HR forecasting, supply and demand, the use of technology in HR planning, data analytics and assessment. You’ll also learn how to manage key HR initiatives such as change, downsizing and restructuring, international HRM, mergers and acquisitions and outsourcing. Successfully completing this course will provide you with the tools necessary to support, be a key player in the organization’s strategic planning and processes, and demonstrate the value and contribution HR can provide.

Pre-requisites:
  • HRMT 3010
  • HRMT 4010
3

Building and Managing Brands explores the intangibles, such as corporate culture, as well as the tangibles, such as product differentiation, which help attain and maintain brand equity in the market. Rapidly emerging business trends, such as corporate social responsibility, are also featured, which help shed light on what companies are doing to separate their brand from competitors. Students will produce a brand book and plan to manage a brand.

Pre-requisites:
  • MKTG 1060
Equivalents:
  • MKTG 306
3

Marketing Action will take the concepts learned in Marketing Essentials and build on them so students will have application experience in creating a new product. The key areas of focus will be on value proposition and business models. Marketing Action will ground their marketing knowledge so they will create sustainable decisions. This is an immersive class where students are required to continue their team projects outside the classroom and present their findings to their instructor and industry professionals.

Pre-requisites:

One of: 

  • MKTG 1060
  • MKTG 326
  • MKTG 390
Equivalents:
  • MKTG 336
3

Consumer behaviour is a dynamic, evolving and interdisciplinary field of study that draws upon research from psychology, sociology, anthropology, economics and neuroscience as well as marketing, with the main aim of understanding the many factors that affect consumers (whether B2C or B2B) during the decision process. It is also one of the most important aspects of marketing given that consumers are at the heart of all decisions we make and by understanding what motivates, shapes, and influences consumer choices marketers have a greater chance of meeting customer expectations and achieving company objectives. Topics include consumer behavior and research; decision-making/buying processes; individual, situational, environmental, ethical, social and cultural influences on consumer behaviour; how this information is gathered, monitored and interpreted in the age of big data; and how marketers draw upon the knowledge techniques and theories from a number of disciplines to improve their understanding of consumers and thus marketing strategy and tactics. A variety of approaches to learning will be used, including discussions, case studies, videos, individual and group learning activities, self-reflection, research and assignments (individual and group).

Pre-requisites:
  • MKTG 1060
Equivalents:
  • MKTG 340
3

This course allows you to use marketing fundamentals to help launch your career. Material introduces planning, design and presentation elements that can provide a competitive advantage in the job market. You will create and manage a LinkedIn profile, incorporating personal preparation/presentation skills with digital communication, visual and written concepts. Planning a career networking project - examining resumes and presentations, as well as evaluating best practices in social networking as they pertain to marketing yourself - will help develop constructive criticism skills.

Equivalents:
  • MKTG 303
3

Project Management introduces you to the standards and best practices of the Project Management Institute. We will cover both the technical and sociocultural components of project management at an introductory level, including project definition, work breakdown structures, cost and scheduling techniques, and an introduction to earned value concepts. Stakeholder communications, risk management, project leadership, and project closure round out the topic coverage.

Equivalents:
  • MNGT 321
3

Municipal Structure and Governance introduces you to the economic development roles and responsibilities of the municipal, provincial and federal government. Additionally, you will assess various economic development delivery models. The role of land, infrastructure, and government policy and regulation will be assessed. The unique challenges, role and relationship with Indigenous communities will also be addressed.

Equivalents:
  • MNGT 367
3

This course provides an introduction to Supply Chain Management, including the building blocks of supply chain strategy, designing the global supply chain, and collaboration across the supply chain. Students will develop an understanding of the supply chain from vision to implementation. Through a mix of theory and practical learning students will be able to develop and manage all aspects of a supply chain.

Pre-requisites:

One of: 

  • MNGT 1200
  • MGMT 1050
Equivalents:
  • MNGT 370
3

Continuous improvement has emphasis within successful companies as they focus on efficiently delivering products or services to meet customer requirements. This course will outline the principles of continuous improvement and expose you to some of the tools and widely-used methods of continuous improvement. Topics include the concepts of W. Edwards Deming, quality assurance, total quality management (TQM), lean Six-Sigma methodologies, and ISO standards. You will also learn how to analyze processes; identify and design improvements; plan and implement change; identify the impact on human resources; and analyse the results and their impact on the business.

Pre-requisites:
  • COMM 1070
  • One of:
    • MNGT 2250
    • MGMT 2050
  • One of:
    • MNGT 2320
    • MNGT 2321
    • STAT 2040
Equivalents:
  • MNGT 213

Precluded Equivalents

  • SCMT 2370
3

In this course, you will gain an understanding of different negotiation styles and conflict resolution in the workplace, and develop strategies and skills to deal with different situations. Topics include negotiation and its components; personality; conflict resolution; negotiation style and temperaments; communication; interest and goals in negotiation; perception and power in negotiation; principles of persuasion; negotiation process; and styles, techniques and strategies. The focus will be on the practical implications of this knowledge for the practitioner.

Pre-requisites:

One of: 

  • MNGT 2250
  • MGMT 2050
  • MGMT 3030
Equivalents:
  • MNGT 251
3

This course examines the process of developing international business strategies, designing and operating systems, and working with people around the world to ensure sustained competitive advantage. Topics include planning, organizing, leading, and controlling profit-related activities across borders and cultures.

Pre-requisites:
  • MNGT 2360
3

In this course, you will explore unpredictable drivers that trigger organizational change and develop capabilities to understand, drive and manage change at all levels of the organization. Topics include Types of Changes, Why Change, Understanding and Diagnosing Change, Resistance to Change, Change Communication Strategies, Change Management Perspectives, Change Management Models, Organization Development and Sense-Making approaches, Sustaining Change. This course will allow you to develop and design solutions to manage the challenges in implementing change initiatives in various areas of organizations.

Pre-requisites:

One of: 

  • MNGT 2250
  • MGMT 2050
  • MGMT 3030
Equivalents:
  • MNGT 252
3

This course examines the integration of all critical business processes from planning to short term scheduling. The design and management of products, processes, services and supply chains is accomplished by an organization’s operations management function. Topics covered include: operations planning and productivity, capacity and strategy design, process and product designs using industry standards, facility layout and location models, job and staff scheduling, and queuing theory.

Pre-requisites:

One of: 

  • SCMT 1255
  • MNGT 2370
Equivalents:
  • SCMT 300
3

Transportation and logistics offers support to the complete cycle of material flow, from purchase to internal control, planning and control of work-in-process, purchasing, shipping, and distribution of the finished product. Whether it is by air, rail, road, water, cable or pipeline, the mode of transportation should lead to efficient and effective transportation of material through the supply chain. This course introduces you to the basic concepts of transportation and logistics. You will examine the holistic concept of how transportation and logistics support SCM, forecasting, inventory management and the planning process, and the physical flow of goods and services in the supply chain. The concepts of intermodal transportation via land, rail, water and air will be investigated.

Pre-requisites:

One of: 

  • SCMT 1255
  • MNGT 2370
Equivalents:
  • SCMT 310
3

This course will cover concepts of total quality management (TQM), just-in-time (JIT) management and lean management. Methodologies such as Deming, Six Sigma and ISO will be covered, as well as procurement, logistics and transportation. You will gain an appreciation of quality concepts and be able to correlate between theory and practical application. Through a mix of theory and practical learning, you will develop an understanding of quality management from a supply chain perspective.

Pre-requisites:

One of: 

  • SCMT 1255
  • MNGT 2370
Equivalents:
  • SCMT 320
3

As a SCM professional, the ability to analyze data and use software at an advanced level is critical. Topics in this course include functional knowledge of technology systems; understanding practical business problems and processes using enterprise resource applications; and evaluation of information technology integration processes and strategies. You will also develop your communication, analytical and data management skills through practical use of software tools (MS Excel, Word, PowerPoint, Power BI) and an overview of major ERP systems.

Pre-requisites:

One of: 

  • SCMT 1255
  • MNGT 2370
Equivalents:
  • SCMT 350
3

Procurement and Contract Management are central to a company’s sustainable development efforts. Purchasing managers need to think strategically about the purchases they make and critically evaluate their purchases in light of the risks and uncertainties of the market place. In Procurement and Contract Management you will address procurement from a strategic perspective as well as at the operational level understanding the relationship between supply chain management and procurement. Topics covered include: procurement process, practices and decisions, procurement and the organization, sourcing, vendor selection, negotiation, contract management, relationship management, and procurement strategy.

Pre-requisites:

One of: 

  • SCMT 1255
  • MNGT 2370
Equivalents:
  • SCMT 370

Precluded Equivalents

  • MNGT 3010
3

For most organizations, inventory is the largest asset on the balance sheet, and minimizing inventory frees up money for use elsewhere in the organization. Materials management addresses techniques to manage inventory in such a way to allow processes or entities in the supply chain to operate interdependently. In this course, you will review the fundamental nature of inventory from a financial, physical, forecasting and operational standpoint. Topics include inventory classification; warehousing; matching supply with demand; tools and methods for managing inventory of items with different demand and supply characteristics; forecasting; just-in-time production; materials requirements planning; and supplier management.

Pre-requisites:

One of: 

  • SCMT 1255
  • MNGT 2370
  • SCMT 2300
Equivalents:
  • SCMT 380
3

This capstone course allows you to demonstrate the integrative knowledge and skills you gained in earlier classes. You will deliver a pitch for a new or innovative idea that applies concepts learned in the program.

Pre-requisites:
  • ACCT 215
  • BCMP 225
  • BMAT 230
  • COMN 220
  • ECON 250
  • ECON 305
  • MKTG 260
  • MNGT 250
  • One of:
    • MNGT 200
    • BLAW 300
3

This course integrates the learning outcomes from pre-requisite courses to enable students to make sustainable and competitive strategic business decisions within a rapidly changing global environment. Critical thinking skills are utilized as students analyze and apply management strategies to business cases and make recommendations to maximize corporate results.

Pre-requisites:
  • One of:
    • ACCT 215
    • ACCT 210
    • ACCT 330
  • One of:
    • BCMP 225
    • BCPT 238
  • One of:
    • BMAT 230
    • BMAT 205
  • One of:
    • COMN 220
    • COMM 290
  • One of:
    • ECON 250
    • ECON 240
  • One of:
    • ECON 305
    • ECON 260
  • One of:
    • MKTG 260
    • MKTG 205
  • One of:
    • MNGT 200
    • BLAW 300
    • BLAW 200
  • One of:
    • MNGT 250
    • MGMT 254
3

To earn a Minor in Construction Project Management, you must complete an additional 12 credits from the courses listed below.

To earn a Minor in Energy, Oil and Gas, you must complete an additional 12 credits from the courses listed below.

To earn Minors in both Construction Project Management and Energy, Oil and Gas, you must complete 12 credits from the courses listed under Construction Project Management and an additional 12 credits from the courses listed under Energy, Oil and Gas.

Junior construction project management

Course Credits

This course introduces essential aspects of the construction industry, from the project life cycle to sustainable practices, as well as different areas of construction management. Students will learn the processes and methods used in the Canadian construction industry, and will also learn about the challenges that they will face. This knowledge will allow the student to contribute to the management of a typical construction project.

3

Senior construction project management

Course Credits

Regulatory requirements, corporate standards, stakeholder concerns, the public and media interest, financial limitations, technological and environmental issues and risk communication are some of the risk factors that contribute to, and affect, management decisions. In this course, you will learn risk assessment, risk analysis, risk mitigation and risk managment planning with a focus in the construction industry. You will also learn about managing conflicts, managing change orders and resolving disputes in the construction projects.

Pre-requisites:
  • One of:
    • STAT 3110
    • STAT 2040
  • One of:
    • CPMT 2030
    • CPMT 3020
3

The Scope and Design Management course is designed to provide you with an appreciation of the roles of both design and the designer on projects. You will examine the concept of design for value, significance of project scope, scope management skills, integrated designs, the client’s brief, design evaluation and the impact of design on procurement and production.

Pre-requisites:

One of 

  • ARCH 1020
  • CPMT 2030
3

Construction project management elective (choose one)

Course Credits

This course examines the continuous evolution of project delivery, the roles of procurement and contracting methods in project success, and the strengths and weaknesses of the contemporary delivery systems. You will focus on current trends in project delivery systems such as Construction Management (CM), Design-Bid-Build (DBB), Design-Build (DB), Engineering Procurement and Construction (EPC), Integrated Project Delivery (IPD) and Public Private Partnerships (PPP). You will study when to use each system, process variations, procurement, contracts and contracts language, multi-party agreements, performance specification, roles of parties, organization and management, conceptual estimating, lean construction, and computer applications.

Pre-requisites:

One of: 

  • CPMT 1010
  • CPMT 2030
3

This course will cover concepts of total quality management (TQM), just-in-time (JIT) management and lean management. Methodologies such as Deming, Six Sigma and ISO will be covered, as well as procurement, logistics and transportation. You will gain an appreciation of quality concepts and be able to correlate between theory and practical application. Through a mix of theory and practical learning, you will develop an understanding of quality management from a supply chain perspective.

Pre-requisites:

One of: 

  • SCMT 1255
  • MNGT 2370
Equivalents:
  • SCMT 320
3

Procurement and Contract Management are central to a company’s sustainable development efforts. Purchasing managers need to think strategically about the purchases they make and critically evaluate their purchases in light of the risks and uncertainties of the market place. In Procurement and Contract Management you will address procurement from a strategic perspective as well as at the operational level understanding the relationship between supply chain management and procurement. Topics covered include: procurement process, practices and decisions, procurement and the organization, sourcing, vendor selection, negotiation, contract management, relationship management, and procurement strategy.

Pre-requisites:

One of: 

  • SCMT 1255
  • MNGT 2370
Equivalents:
  • SCMT 370

Precluded Equivalents

  • MNGT 3010
3

Junior energy, oil and gas minor cores

Course Credits

This course is designed for non-science students to increase their literacy in a highly technical field. It develops foundational knowledge of the Canadian oil and gas industry. Knowledge gained provides a perspective of the oil industry, as well as potential roles that support the industry. Topics include an overview of global energy markets, the relationship of the oil and gas industry with the Canadian economy, and the differences between the Canadian and international oil and gas industries. Also discussed are how oil and gas are found, developed, and brought to market. The future of the oil industry in Canada will be introduced in relation to society, technology, geopolitics, and energy demand.

3

Senior energy, oil and gas minor cores

Course Credits

The Canadian oil and gas industry affects land, water, and air quality. This course reviews environmental impacts, sustainability, and regulatory aspects of the oil and gas industry associated with each phase of an energy asset’s life cycle. This course seeks to create conversations about the sustainability of the Canadian oil and gas industry including Canada’s energy transition. Renewable or alternative energy resources that are commercially viable in Canada will be discussed with consideration of current and future applications. Attention will be paid to the impact of environmental and regulatory considerations on corporate planning, investment, and stakeholders.

Pre-requisites:
  • PTPR 1255
3

In this course you will apply microeconomic principles to assess and evaluate oil and gas projects. Key concepts of project management, risk management, and financial analysis in the oil and gas industry are discussed. Opportunities are provided to assist in developing a working knowledge of economic evaluations as used by the oil and gas industry. The roles of the various stakeholders involved in an oil and gas project will also be examined. The link between business drivers, corporate strategy, and economic evaluation will be established.

Pre-requisites:
  • PTPR 1255
3

This course explores current trends in exploration and development in the Canadian oil and gas industry. The subjects of oil and gas geology and engineering are discussed, and provide context for other topics, including why we have hydrocarbon accumulations in Western Canada; how they are trapped; and how we explore for and produce hydrocarbons. Case studies of the oil sands and other key development plays in Canada will be included.

Pre-requisites:
  • PTPR 1255
3

This course will cover concepts of total quality management (TQM), just-in-time (JIT) management and lean management. Methodologies such as Deming, Six Sigma and ISO will be covered, as well as procurement, logistics and transportation. You will gain an appreciation of quality concepts and be able to correlate between theory and practical application. Through a mix of theory and practical learning, you will develop an understanding of quality management from a supply chain perspective.

Pre-requisites:

One of: 

  • SCMT 1255
  • MNGT 2370

 

Equivalents:
  • SCMT 320
3

Progression

You must attain a PGPA and/or a CGPA of 2.0 or better each semester and pass the prerequisite courses to progress through the program.

To qualify for graduation, you must pass all courses, attain a CGPA of 2.0 or better and complete course requirements within the prescribed timelines.

Review our grading and progression procedure >

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Explore your options!

Some courses in this program are available through Open Studies. You can complete courses via Open Studies to get a head start on your education, reduce your course load once accepted into a credentialed program, or determine which career path best suits you before you fully commit. 

You may also take courses for general interest or personal and professional development.

Admission requirements

Domestic requirements

Applicants must demonstrate English language proficiency and meet the requirements in one of the following options or equivalent.

Admission is determined based on an applicant's academic history, including high school and post-secondary courses. Post-secondary level courses with similar learning outcomes may be considered to meet admission requirements.

SAIT accepts high school course equivalents for admission for applicants educated outside Alberta.

Option one

An overall minimum average of 65%, calculated using your final grades in:

  • English 30-1 (must have achieved at least 60%), and
  • Math 30-1 (must have achieved at least 60%) or Math 30-2 (must have achieved at least 70%), and
  • two courses from Group A, and
  • one course from either Group A or B.

Group A (academics)

Academic courses may include Grade 12, 30-level or equivalent*:

  • Accounting
  • Biology
  • Business
  • Chemistry
  • Economics
  • Finance
  • Geography
  • History
  • Indigenous Studies
  • Information Technology
  • Languages
  • Management
  • Marketing
  • Mathematics 31
  • Philosophy
  • Physics
  • Political Sciences
  • Psychology
  • Science
  • Social Studies 30-1
  • Sociology

*Other courses may be considered.

Group B (other)

One of the following:

  • Art 30 or 31
  • Drama 30
  • Music 30 (choral, instrumental, general)
  • Physical Education 30
  • Religion 35
  • Social Studies 30-2

OR

  • Other five-credit Grade 12 subjects or a combination of two three-credit Grade 12 subjects may be considered.
  • Five credits of advanced career and technology courses.
  • Business-related high dual-credit courses may be used for admission purposes.

Option two

A SAIT Business Administration diploma or a Bachelor of Applied Business Administration or equivalent from an accredited post-secondary institution, with a minimum 2.3 cumulative GPA (67% or C+).

Option three

A two-year diploma or a bachelor’s degree from an accredited post-secondary institution, with a minimum 2.3 cumulative GPA (67% or C+) and completion of English 30-1 and Math 30-1 or Math 30-2 or equivalents.

All applicants who were educated outside of Canada must demonstrate English Language proficiency and provide proof they meet the program admission requirements with an international document assessment. Find out what educational documents are accepted and assessment options.

SAIT may also accept courses completed at certain international post-secondary institutions.

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Academic Upgrading

Missing an admission requirement for this program? Upgrade your prior education to help you receive admission into one of SAIT's career programs.

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English language proficiency

All applicants must demonstrate English language proficiency prior to admission, including students educated in Canada.

Transfer agreements

At SAIT, we evaluate post-secondary credit you have previously earned and apply it to your SAIT credential. Explore our formal transfer agreements available for this program.

We can evaluate your prior education, even if we don't have a formal agreement in place.

Submit a transfer credit application

Campus Alberta Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) agreement

Program name
Provincial Business Administration pathway
Available credits:
n/a

Upon successful completion of business administration coursework from one of the Alberta institutions listed on the Campus Alberta Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) agreement, you may be eligible to transfer credit to our business administration diploma or bachelor's degree. For more information, contact an academic advisor at the School of Business.

Transfer options for graduates

Build on the knowledge you’ve learned at SAIT. The opportunity to advance your education at an accredited post-secondary institution may be available.

🔗 Visit Transfer Alberta search tool for a full list of transfer opportunities within the province.

Available intakes

Fall 2024

Start dates:

Domestic students: Waitlisted
  • Application deadline: Extended
International students: Closed
  • Application deadline: May 29, 2024

Costs

2024/25 tuition and fees

The following estimated costs are effective as of July 1, 2024.

Domestic students

The estimated total cost of tuition and fees for domestic students is based on the recommended course load per year.
Year Number of semesters Tuition fees Additional fees Total per year
1 2 $7,260 $1,608 $8,868
2 2 $7,260 $1,608 $8,868
3 2 $7,260 $1,608 $8,868
4 2 $7,260 $1,608 $8,868
Total cost:
$35,472

The estimated total cost of tuition and fees for international students is based on the recommended course load per year.
Year Number of semesters Tuition fees Additional fees Total per year
1 2 $21,270 $1,608 $22,878
2 2 $21,270 $1,608 $22,878
3 2 $21,270 $1,608 $22,878
4 2 $21,270 $1,608 $22,878
Total cost:
$91,512

Books and supplies are approximately $1,000 - $1,500 per full-time year.

This is a bring-your-own-device program with a standard hardware and software requirement. See the specific requirements on our computers and laptops page.

Find your booklist on the SAIT Bookstore's website. The booklist will be available close to your start date. Can’t find your program or course? The bookstore didn't receive a textbook list. Contact your program directly to determine if they’re still refining course details or if you're in luck; no textbook purchase is required for that term.

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Financial aid

Paying for your education may feel overwhelming, but we have resources and programs that can help, including information about payment options, student loans, grants and scholarships.

Admission Process

Early admission criteria

Early admission will be offered to qualified applicants based on one of the following criteria:

  1. An overall minimum average of 75%, where English 30-1 and Math 30-1 have to be at least 60%. The average will be calculated using English 30-1, Math 30-1, two courses from Group A, and one course from either Group A or B.
  2. Applicants have achieved, or will achieve, a minimum GPA of 2.7 in the SAIT Business Administration diploma or equivalent.
  3. Applicants who have achieved, or will achieve, a minimum GPA of 2.7 in the post-secondary admission requirement.

Early admission will be offered until December 15 each year or until the program is full. Applicants will be ranked, and seats will be offered in order of the ranked list until the program is full. Once the program is full, applicants will be placed on the waitlist in ranked order.

Selection criteria

In the selection process, applicants will be assessed on the following criteria, and seats will be offered accordingly:

  • Applicants who do not qualify for early admission or who qualify after the early admission deadline will be placed in selection and academically ranked according to the admission requirements.
  • Career investigation and/or interviews may also be required during the selection process.
  • Selection will begin on December 18 and be done continuously until the program has been filled.
  • Applicants will then be offered a seat or waitlisted based on ranking and availability.

When applying in the application portal, select Bachelor of Business Administration. You will declare your major before your second year of the program.

Communication during admission

Email is the primary source of communication during the admission process. Ensure your personal email account is managed appropriately to receive our emails, files and communications. We recommend you add the business.advising@sait.ca domain to your safe senders' list, or you risk missing critical email messages.

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Begin your application

Apply now using the online application portal. 

Ensure you have a valid Visa or Mastercard to pay the non-refundable application fee of $120 for domestic applicants or $150 for international applicants. 

Information sessions

Prepare for a strong start in your chosen program or get the details you need to decide your future path.

Our expert staff and faculty are ready to answer your questions and provide information about the following:

  • What sets SAIT apart
  • An introduction to the program and area of study
  • Admission requirements
  • Future career paths
  • Information on the earning potential and graduate employment rates.

Contact us

School of Business Advising

Phone
403.284.8485
Email
business.advising@sait.ca

International Student Advising

Phone
403.284.8852
Email
international@sait.ca
a view of the moutains and stream in between

Oki, Âba wathtech, Danit'ada, Tawnshi, Hello.

SAIT is located on the traditional territories of the Niitsitapi (Blackfoot) and the people of Treaty 7 which includes the Siksika, the Piikani, the Kainai, the Tsuut’ina and the Îyârhe Nakoda of Bearspaw, Chiniki and Goodstoney.

We are situated in an area the Blackfoot tribes traditionally called Moh’kinsstis, where the Bow River meets the Elbow River. We now call it the city of Calgary, which is also home to the Métis Nation of Alberta, Region 3.