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Department History

Aeronautics History

History of Aeronautics

Date: Dec. 13, 2016

Close on the heels of the world's first transatlantic solo flight by Charles Lindbergh in 1927, aviation history was also being made at the Provincial Institute of Technology and Art (PITA) - today's SAIT. Twenty-eight students were enrolled in an Aeronautics evening course in 1929/30. 

A two-year Aeronautical Engineers day program (900 hours/year) started in 1930/31 with eight students; it was offered until 1937/38. Beginning in 1938/39 and running through 1944/45 was a 1,140 hours/year Aeronautics program. A three-month Commercial Pilot's Ground School was offered in 1931/32 and 1932/33. 

Evening aeronautics training continued through 1932/33. All evening classes at PITA (except Art) were then suspended for several years due to the Great Depression. Aeronautics evening classes resumed in 1937/38 with 22 students. Daytime enrolment grew steadily throughout the decade, reaching 72 in 1938/39. 

Responding to needs of World War Two, PITA also offered a special six-week Aeronautics course in June, July and November 1939. Some 181 students graduated and took up positions with the Canadian and British air forces or in the aviation industry as aircraft riggers, fitters, electricians and wireless operator mechanics.  

PITA also delivered several aeronautical trades programs as part of the federal War Emergency Training Program, in operation 1940 - 1945 to provide technical training for industrial workers employed in war production. 
The grounding of all Canadian privately owned aircraft during the latter part of the war resulted in reduced civilian enrolments in PITA's daytime Aeronautics program: just nine students registered in 1943/44 and four the following year. 

With the end of the war, PITA launched three new day programs in 1945/46: Air Engineers (two years), Airframe Mechanics (one year) and Aero Engine Mechanics (one year). The latter two were discontinued as separate programs after 1946/47 but the curriculum continued to be covered in the Air Engineers program. In 1946/47 a third year was added to the Air Engineers program and its name changed to Aeronautical Engineers (and later Aeronautical Engineering) and then Aeronautical Engineering Technology in 1963/64. Air Engineers was renamed Air Engineering in 1948 - 49. 

In fall 1946, aeronautical training returned to PITA's North Hill campus, which had been taken over during the war to serve as the No. 2 Wireless Training School for the Royal Canadian Air Force. A drill hall erected by the RCAF would house the aeronautics hangar and shops for the next 40 years, when the Colonel Walker Building was officially opened in 1986. 

In 1951/52, Air Engineering was renamed Aircraft Maintenance Engineering. Another name change came in 1957/58, to Aircraft Maintenance Technology. The renaming to Aircraft Maintenance Engineers Technology took place in 1972/73 and remains that today. 

1953/54 saw the Aeronautical Department construct a replica of the 1909 Bleriot aircraft. In 1956, this craft flew across the Channel from France to England in a re-enactment of Bleriot's famous flight. And in 1958/59, students built a replica of a 1916 Sopworth Pup. A test fly-past was performed May 23, 1959. 

A two-year Avionics Technology program launched in 1975/76. It was initially under the Electronics Department and was transferred to the Transportation Department in 2001/02. In 1990/91 the program was renamed Avionics Engineering Technology and in 1997/98 reverted back to Avionics Technology. 

The Mechanical Engineering Technologies two-year diploma program (in the Mechanical Trades and Technologies Department) added a third-year Aeronautics option in 1995/96.
In 1999 - 2000 a one-year program — Aircraft Structural Repair and Overhaul Technician — came on stream. It was renamed Aircraft Structures Technician in 2002/03. 

Aeronautical Engineering Technology was not offered after 2003/04. 

Today, a unique SAIT campus — the Art Smith Aero Centre for Training and Technology — which opened at the Calgary International Airport in 2004, is the site for all SAIT aeronautics programs. The facility features a 21,000 square foot hangar housing a Boeing 737-700, as well as 13 labs and seven classrooms. 

SAIT currently offers full-time programs in Aircraft Maintenance Engineers Technology, Aircraft Structures Technician, and Avionics Technology, along with continuing education and industry training courses.

A note on the administration

The Aeronautics Department was established in 1931/32. It underwent a number of name changes over the decades, eventually becoming part of the Transportation Department in 1999 — also including rail and automotive industry training. On May 11, 2007, SAIT Management Council approved the renaming of academic departments to "schools".

Art Department History

History of the Art Department

Date: Nov. 23, 2016

Saturday morning art classes commenced at the Provincial Institute of Technology and Art (PITA) in 1916/17, the school's inaugural year. They were short-lived, however, shortly after PITA facilities were given over to the war effort. Following the war, courses included art teachers and for prospective commercial artists.

A daytime drawing and painting class in 1920/21 attracted six students and the following year an attempt was made to start an art course but there was not enough interest.

The main building (today's Heritage Hall) opened in 1922 and art facilities were located on the third floor of the east wing.

An evening class in show cards and posters was first offered in 1926/27, with 31 students enrolled. It proved popular and was a perennial offering, running through at least 1932/33.

1926/27 was also the formal beginning of the Art Department. Just two students were registered in the two-year Commercial Art program.

New "Find Yourself" five-week courses were offered in July/August 1926 to anyone age 15 and up. The art line-up included commercial art, show cards and posters.

The Art Department became the first at PITA to offer scholarships in 1927/28. Three awards ($25, $15, $10) were the gift of Mr. Henry K Christensen of Calgary.

The Art Department awarded its first diploma in 1930/31. enrolment continued to climb, with 40-day students, 90 evening students in classes and 13 students in an evening show card writing class.

In 1931/32 four certificates were offered; courses could be taken in the day and/or evening in Elementary, Fine Arts (Drawing and Painting), Commercial Art, or Applied Art and Crafts. Approximately four years were required to earn a diploma.

1932/33 was a grim year for PITA as all evening classes — except Art — were cancelled due to the economic times of the Great Depression. Art enrolment s continued to be healthy, with 44-day students and 33 in evening studies.

1934/35 saw the launch of a one-year Normal Art Course for those who had completed a teacher training program. It continued through 1936/37.

The Art Department held exhibitions in 27 towns throughout Alberta in 1934/35. While just one diploma was issued, enrolment remained strong with 62-day students and 38 students in evening classes.

In the summer of 1937, 125 teachers attended arts and crafts classes including weaving, carving, batik, papier-mache and clay work. They were awarded a certificate after two summers of study.

The Art Department (along with the Dressmaking and Millinery program) relocated to Coste House, a mansion in the Mount Royal district. In August 1940 when the PITA campus was taken over to serve as the No. 2 Wireless School of the Royal Canadian Air Force. The programs would not move back to the North Hill campus until the summer of 1946.

Among the highlights of 1942/43 was the launch of Saturday morning classes for children. As well, the artwork for the Calgary Zoo's new fossil house was done by three Art Department students — a mural painting, foreground modelling, and models of prehistoric birds — and a number of travelling art shows exhibited at Coste House.

Students' works appeared in a number of galleries and exhibitions throughout Western Canada in 1948/49. Daytime students numbered 69 and 197 were enrolled in evening classes.

Programs offered in 1950/51 were General Art (two years), Fine Art Advanced (four years), Commercial Art Advanced (four years), and Applied Arts and General Crafts (three years). A new three-year program — Pottery and Ceramics, Industrial Design — was also added.

The East Block (today's John Ware Building) was completed in 1958 and the Art Department relocated there. The more spacious quarters also accommodated PITA's art gallery.

December 24, 1960, was a history-making day: PITA was renamed the Southern Alberta Institute of Technology (SAIT) by the provincial government, and the Art Department was given new recognition as the Alberta College of Art (ACA).

1964/65 saw a four-year Sculpture program added. 1970/71 was the final year for Applied Art and General Crafts, and a four-year Fabrics and Metal program launched in 1971/72.

Programming in 1978/79 consisted of a four-year Diploma in Visual Arts with seven majors: Visual Communications, Painting, Print Making, Sculpture, Metals, Textiles, and Ceramics. A fifth-year option was also available.

SAIT became a board-governed institution on April 1, 1982; previously it has been provincially administered. ACA became independent of SAIT on July 1, 1985.

Banff Summer School

In 1933/34 instructor Alfred Leighton established a two-week summer school in art at Kananaskis. In 1935, the program became affiliated with the Extension Department of the University of Alberta. It relocated to Banff and expanded to three weeks and was renamed the Banff School of Fine Arts.

The school was broadly advertised through the literature of the Canadian Pacific Railway and attracted students from across North America. In 1945/46 the program expanded to six weeks. The following year it ran for five weeks, with 224 students enrolled. In 1947/48 the program became the sole responsibility of the university.

Some Distinguished Instructors of the Art Department:

  • S.E Blodgett, 1948 - 1976
  • Nicholas de Grandmaison, 1931/32
  • H.G Glyde, 1935 - 1946
  • A.Y Jackson, Banff summer school, 1943/44
  • Illingworth Kerr, 1947 - 1967
  • A.C Leighton, 1929 - 1941
  • Walter J. Phillips, 1941 - 1946
Automotive History

History of Automotive Department

Dates: 1916 - 2016

photograph of motor mechanics class at SAIT

1916/17: Provincial Institute of Trades and Art (PITA) officially opened on October 26, 1916, with two programs, one of which was Motor Mechanics.  Six WWI Veterans enrolled in the program.  Mr. C.A. Maus was the original Instructor teaching motor mechanics as well as the machine shop.

1917/20: Courses continued for both veterans and civilians in day and evening programs in the temporary quarters at the Colonel Walker School at 1921 Ninth Ave.

1920/21: Mr. C.A. Choate joined the Motor Mechanics staff in 1920 and remained until 1951 much of that time as Department Head.

Motor Mechanics, an eight-month course had the following enrolment s: day enrolment saw 32 students, the part-day program saw 4 students, and evening program had 25 students. An evening course called Car Owners started with nine students. Another evening course started, called Battery and Ignition had 37 students.

1921/22: Motor Mechanics enrolment including day and evening exceeded any other day and evening programs with 44 students in the day and 45 students in the evening. 

The Battery and Ignition course started as an eight-month day program in addition to an evening with 22 day and 28 evening students.

1922/23: Motor Mechanics name changed to Industrial Automobile Engineering and became a two-year course (eight months each year for a total of 16 months) - the day program had a total of 60 students and the evening program had 36 students.  It should be noted that the reported enrolment of the two or three-year courses is, in most cases, a combination of the first year, second year and third year of the program.

The Battery and Ignition course had 27 students in the daytime program, and 22 students in the evening program. (There is no enrolment information on the Car Owner's course).

1923/24: Industrial Automobile Engineering program had a total enrolment of 82-day students in the two-year daytime program, and 29 students in the evening program. 

Battery and Ignition name changed to Automotive Electricity. Records show 34 students taking the daytime course, and 35 students enrolled in the evening offering.

1924/25: Industrial Automobile Engineering saw a total of 60 students in the daytime offering, and 33 students in the evening. 

  • Automotive Electricity had 21 students in the daytime, and 44 students in the evening.

1925/26: Industrial Automobile Engineering name changed to Automobile Service Engineering; a two-year program with a total enrolment of 71 students in the daytime, and 39 students in the evening. An Automotive Electricity course had 21 students in the daytime offering, and 26 students in the evening.

1926/27: Automobile Service Engineering went to a three-year program, with a total of 16 months as follows: eight months in the first year, five months in the second year, and three months in the third year. enrolment grew to a total of 90 students in the daytime, and an impressive 89 students in the evening program

  • The Automotive Electricity course was reduced to five months from eight months. Records showed 26 students in the daytime, and 24 students in the evening.
  • A PITA, evening classes went to two shifts: 6 to 8 pm and 8 to 10 pm.

An addition measuring 159 feet x 70 feet opened in the north end of the "A" Shops to reduce overcrowding for several programs including Automotive.

1927/28: Automobile Service Engineering program remained three years in length as enrolment grew to a total of 106 students in the day, and 90 students studying in the evening.

The Automotive Electricity course remained at five months, with 15 students in the day, and 16 students studying in the evening. The Car Owner's evening program started up again in the evening with 48 students. 

1928/29: Automobile Service Engineering remains at three years in duration with a total of 114 daytime students, and 119 enrolled in the evening offering.

The Automotive Electricity course is still five months long, with 28 students in the day, and 36 students in the evening.  The Car Owner's course had 33 students.

Another smaller extension (40 feet x 70 feet) was added to the Northeast wing of the "A" Shops.

1929/30: Frank Wynne joined the Automotive Department staff in 1929. 

  • Automobile Service Engineering (a three-year program) saw a total of 133 students in the day, and 37 students in the evening
  • The Automotive Electricity course remains at five months with 30 students in the day, and 23 students in the evening. The Car Owner's course had eight students in the evening

1930/31: 

  • Automobile Service Engineering — three years | day 107, evening 27
  • Automotive Electricity — five months | day 17, evening 21
  • Car Owners — evening zero

1931/32: 

  • Automobile Service Engineering — three years | day 92, evening zero
  • Automotive Electricity — four-month | day 16, evening 21

1932/33: 

  • Automobile Service Engineering name changed to Automobile Mechanics — still a three-year course (16 months). Auto Body repair was added to the first year of Automobile Mechanics
  • Automobile Servicing —one year (eight months) course was added | 17-day students
  • Automotive Electricity — 16-day students, evening zero

1933/34: 

  • Automobile Mechanics — total enrolment day 98, evening zero
  • Automotive Electricity — day eight, evening zero
  • Automobile Servicing — day one | This was the last year for this course

No P.I.T. Evening courses offered this year except for Art courses.

1934/38: 

  • Automobile Mechanics — three year... day total 93
  • Automotive Electricity — 5 months... day 12

The RCAF took possession of the Institute on Sept 1, 1940, to establish the No.2 Wireless School as a component of the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan.

Many P.I.T.A. programs including Automobile training moved to the Grandstand (not the current one) at the Calgary Exhibition Grounds and remained there until September 1946.

1939/40: A.C. Wagner is listed as the Chief Instructor (Department Head) of the Automotive Department.

1946/47: Industrial Arts for Teachers was taught at PITA. Farm Mechanics and Automotive subjects included as part of the course.

enrolment for Automobile Mechanics and Automotive Electricity fell off abruptly during the war but was increased by the War Emergency Training Program (WEPT) students.

1948/49: Training for Apprentices under the new Apprenticeship Act started in May 1948.

  • enrolment for the first class of Auto Body — three-year apprenticeship was 42 students.

1949/50: 

  • Automobile Mechanics (program changed to a two year from a three year) — total enrolment 45 students
  • Automotive Electricity — five-month program | 8 students
  • Auto Body Apprentice — three-year course (eight weeks, six weeks, six weeks.) | enrolment 100 students
  • Motor Mechanic Apprentice — four-year course (eight weeks, eight weeks, eight weeks, eight weeks) | 60 students

Motor Mechanic Apprentice training started this year and was held in a lean-to on the north side of the Aero Building (one of the buildings left by the #2 Wireless School.) Motor Mechanic App. Training remained there until the "B" Building was finished in the fall of 1952. 

This was the last year for the Automotive Electricity program that had been offered every year since 1921.

1950/51: Reconstruction began on the north end of "A" Shops to accommodate the Auto Body Apprentices and provide space for a paint booth. This was shop #A-124. 

Auto Body and Motor Mechanics Apprenticeship taught. A new program of Instructor Training was organized and taught by E.W. Wood, O. Kingsep and M.J. Tomlinson on the subject of shop teaching techniques.

1951/52: The "B" Building was under construction north of the "A" Shops to provide permanent accommodation for Motor Mechanics Apprenticeship (south side) and Building Construction (north side). This building was 274 feet long by 186 feet wide.

F.B. (Frank) Wynne becomes Dept. Head.

1952/53: 

  • Automobile Mechanics — two-year course | total enrolment of 38 students
  • Motor Mechanics Apprenticeship — four year course (eight-eight-eight-eight) | 700 students
  • Auto Body Apprenticeship — 135 students

Construction of "B" Building completed for fall classes. Opening ceremonies held on Jan. 6, 1953. This was the largest addition to the campus since 1922.

1953/54: Automobile Mechanics name changed to Automotive Service Engineering and remains a two-year course.

  • Automotive Service Engineering — 33 students
  • Motor Mechanics Apprenticeship — 929 students
  • Auto Body Apprenticeship — 273 students

1954/55:

  • Automotive Service Engineering — 40 students
  • Motor Mechanics Apprenticeship — 676 students
  • Auto Body Apprenticeship — 221 students

1957/58: Automotive Service Engineering name changed to Automotive Service Technology.

A shop was added to the west end of the "B" Building (B113) to enable the first year Automotive Service Technology to move out of the "A" shops in the fall of 1958.

1958/68: enrolment for day courses remained stable. Automotive Service Technology, Motor Mechanic Apprentices, and Autobody Apprentices courses offered.

1967/68: F.B. Wynne on sick-leave in May 1967 and then retired as Dept Head. George Hare became acting Dept Head from May 1967 to Dec. 31 1968.

1969/70: H.A. (Al) Spencer named Department Head on Jan. 1, 1969. The Automotive Department and the Diesel Department join and became Automotive-Diesel Department.

Partsman Apprenticeship is launched as a three-year apprenticeship program (eight-six-six).

1973/74: Small Engine Mechanics day course started.

1976/77: enrolment Regular Day courses:

  • Automotive Service Technology — 93 students
  • Diesel Mechanics — 61 students
  • Small Engine Mechanics — 30 students

enrolment Apprenticeship courses:

  • Auto Body Mechanic — 155 students
  • Heavy Duty Mechanic — 340 students
  • Motor Mechanic — 695 students
  • Partsman — 102 students

1977/82:

  • Automotive Service Technology — a two-year course
  • Diesel Mechanics — one year course
  • Small Engine Mechanics — eight weeks course
  • Auto Body Mechanic Apprentice — three years (eight weeks, six weeks, six weeks)
  • Heavy Duty Mechanic Apprentice — four year (eight weeks, eight weeks, six weeks, six weeks)
  • Motor Mechanic Apprentice — four years (eight weeks, eight weeks, eight weeks, eight weeks)
  • Partsman Apprentice — three years (eight weeks, six weeks, six weeks)

1982/84:

  • Automotive Service Technology — a two-year course
  • Diesel Mechanics — one year course
  • Small Engine Mechanics — an eight-week program
  • Auto Body Mechanic Apprentice — three years (eight weeks, six weeks, six weeks)
  • Heavy Duty Mechanic Apprentice — four year (eight weeks, eight weeks, six weeks, six weeks)
  • Motor Mechanic Apprentice — four years (eight weeks, eight weeks, eight weeks, eight weeks)
  • Partsman Apprentice — three years (eight weeks, six weeks, six weeks)
  • Transport Refrigeration Mechanic Apprentice started this year — three year (eight weeks, eight weeks, eight weeks)

1984/85: Department Head - H.A (Al) Spencer retires Dec. 31, 1984, and Blake Gordon named Department Head as of Jan. 1, 1985. Department Head designation remained until 1998 when the name was changed to Dean.

1984/87:

  • Automotive Service Technology — a two-year course
  • Diesel Mechanics — one year course
  • Small Engine Mechanics — an eight-week course
  • Auto Body Mechanic Apprentice — three-year course (eight weeks, six weeks, six weeks)
  • Heavy Duty Mechanic Apprentice — four-year course (eight weeks, eight weeks, six weeks, six weeks)
  • Motor Mechanic Apprentice — four-year course (eight weeks, eight weeks, eight weeks, eight weeks)
  • Partsman Apprentice — three-year course (eight weeks, six weeks, six weeks)
  • Transport Refrigeration Mechanic Apprentice — three-year course (eight weeks, eight weeks, eight weeks)
  • Recreation Vehicle Mechanic — two years (eight weeks, eight weeks)

1987/88:

  • Automotive Service Technology — a two-year course
  • Heavy Equipment Technician — one year (formerly Diesel Mechanics)
  • Small Engine Mechanics — a 12-week course
  • Auto Body Mechanic Apprentice — three-year course (eight weeks, six weeks, six weeks)
  • Heavy Duty Mechanic Apprentice — four-year course (eight weeks, eight weeks, six weeks, six weeks)
  • Motor Mechanic Apprentice — four-year course (eight weeks, eight weeks, eight weeks, eight weeks)
  • Partsman Apprentice — three years (eight weeks, six weeks, six weeks)
  • Transport Refrigeration Mechanic Apprentice — three years (eight weeks, eight weeks, eight weeks)
  • Recreation Vehicle Mechanic — two years (eight weeks, eight weeks)

1988/92:

  • Automotive Service Technology — a two-year course
  • Heavy Equipment Technician — one year (formerly Diesel Mechanics)
  • Light Industrial Mechanics — 12-week course (formerly Small Engine Mechanics)
  • Auto Body Mechanic Apprentice — three-year course (eight weeks, six weeks, six weeks)
  • Heavy Duty Mechanic Apprentice — four-year course (eight weeks, eight weeks, eight weeks, eight weeks)
  • Motor Mechanic Apprentice — four-year course (eight weeks, eight weeks, eight weeks, eight weeks)
  • Partsman Apprentice — three years (eight weeks, six weeks, six weeks)
  • Transport Refrigeration Mechanic Apprentice — three years (eight weeks, eight weeks, eight weeks)
  • Recreation Vehicle Mechanic — two years (eight weeks, eight weeks)

1992/95:

  • Automotive Service Technology — a two-year course
  • Heavy Equipment Technician — one year
  • Light Industrial Mechanics — LIM one Engine Repair, two weeks, LIM two Outdoor Power Equipment (optional 12-week course)
  • Auto Body Mechanic Apprentice — three-year course (eight weeks, six weeks, six weeks)
  • Heavy Duty Mechanic Apprentice — four-year course (eight weeks, eight weeks, eight weeks, eight weeks)
  • Motor Mechanic Apprentice — four-year course (eight weeks, eight weeks, eight weeks, eight weeks)
  • Partsman Apprentice — three years (eight weeks, six weeks, six weeks)
  • Transport Refrigeration Mechanic Apprentice — three years (eight weeks, eight weeks, eight weeks)
  • Recreation Vehicle Mechanic — two years (eight weeks, eight weeks)

1995: General Motors Automotive Student Education Program (ASEP) starts.

1995/99:

  • Automotive Service Technology — a two-year course
  • Heavy Equipment Technician — one year (formerly Diesel Mechanics)
  • Light Industrial Mechanics — changed to Outdoor Power Equipment Technician
  • OPET1 Engine Repair — a 12-week course
  • OPET2 Outdoor Power Equipment (optional 12-week course)
  • Auto Body Technician Apprentice — three-year course (eight weeks, six weeks, six weeks) after 1995 eight weeks, eight weeks, eight weeks
  • Heavy Equipment Technician Apprentice — four-year course (eight weeks, eight weeks, eight weeks, eight weeks)
  • Automotive Service Technician — four-year course (eight weeks, eight weeks, eight weeks, eight weeks)
  • Partsman Apprentice — three years (eight weeks, six weeks, six weeks)

Partsman Apprentice WATS (Weekly Apprenticeship Training System) started in 1998/99. The academic hours of training are the same as the regular apprenticeship but taken one day a week from Sept. to April for the first and third year or Sept. to June for the second year.

  • Transport Refrigeration Mechanic Apprentice — three years (eight weeks, eight weeks, eight weeks)
  • Recreation Vehicle Mechanic — two years (eight weeks, eight weeks) in 1995 and goes to three years in 1996 (eight weeks, zero weeks, eight weeks)

1998: Blake Gordon seconded to Special Project Management position in April 1998.

Dave Jones becomes Dean of Automotive-Diesel Department in May 1998.

1999/00: Blake Gordon retires May 1999.

  • Aircraft Structural Repair and Overhaul Technician — one year program came to the Transportation Department in 1999/00
  • Aircraft Maintenance Engineers Technology — the two-year program is shown in Transportation Department in 1999/00
  • Aeronautical Engineering Technology — second and third year shown in the 1999/00 yearbook in the Transportation Department
  • Automotive Service Technology — a two-year course
  • Heavy Equipment Technician — one year (formerly Diesel Mechanics)
  • Light Industrial Mechanics — name changed to Outdoor Power Equipment Technician
  • OPET1 Engine Repair — a 12-week program
  • OPET2 Outdoor Power Equipment (optional 12 weeks)
  • Auto Body Technician Apprentice — three-year course (eight weeks, six weeks, six weeks) after 1995 eight weeks, eight weeks, eight weeks
  • Heavy Equipment Technician Apprentice — four-year course (eight weeks, eight weeks, eight weeks, eight weeks)
  • Automotive Service Technician Apprentice — four-year course  (eight weeks, eight weeks, eight weeks, eight weeks)
  • Partsman Apprentice — three-year course (eight weeks, six weeks, six weeks)

Partsman Apprentice WATS (Weekly Apprenticeship Training System) started in 1998/99. The academic hours of training are the same as the regular apprenticeship but taken one day a week from Sept. to April for the first and third year or Sept. to June for the second year.

  • Transport Refrigeration Mechanic Apprentice — three-year course (eight weeks, eight weeks, eight weeks)
  • Recreation Vehicle Mechanic — two-year course (eight weeks, eight weeks) in 1995 and goes to three years in 1996 (eight weeks, zero weeks, eight weeks)

2000/01:

  • Aircraft Structural Repair and Overhaul Technician — one year course
  • Aircraft Maintenance Engineers Technology — a two-year course
  • Aeronautical Engineering Technology — second and third year
  • Automotive Service Technology — two-year diploma program
  • Heavy Equipment Technician — one-year certificate program
  • Business Administration — Automotive Marketing - one year (two academic semesters) at SAIT, and four semesters at Georgian College, with four work/co-op terms
  • OPET1 Engine Repair — a 12-week course
  • OPET2 Outdoor Power Equipment — optional 12-week course
  • Auto Body Technician Apprentice — Collison, three years; Refinishing, three years; Collison & Refinishing, four years
  • Heavy Equipment Technician Apprentice — four-year course (eight weeks, eight weeks, eight weeks, eight weeks)
  • Automotive Service Technician Apprentice — four-year course (eight weeks, eight weeks, eight weeks, eight weeks)
  • Partsman Apprentice — three-year course (eight weeks, six weeks, six weeks)
  • Partsman WATS program (refer to the WATS explanation reported in 1995/99
  • Transport Refrigeration Mechanic Apprentice — three-year course (eight weeks, eight weeks, eight weeks)
  • Recreation Vehicle Mechanic Apprentice — three-year course (eight weeks, eight weeks, eight weeks)

2001: Dave Jones retires in June 2001 and Brian Moukperian becomes Dean, Transportation Department.

2001/02:

  • Aircraft Structural Repair and Overhaul Technician — one year course
  • Aircraft Maintenance Engineers Technology — two year
  • Aeronautical Engineering Technology — second and third year shown in the 1999/00 yearbook in the Transportation Department
  • Avionics Technology — Automotive Marketing — three-year course (six academic semesters of which two are held at SAIT and four at Georgian College and four work terms)
  • Rail Traffic Control — a two-year course
  • Auto Body Technician Apprentice — Collison, three-year course (six weeks, six weeks, eight weeks); Refinishing, three-year course (six weeks, six weeks, four weeks); Collision and Refinishing, four-year course (six weeks, six weeks, eight weeks, four weeks)
  • Heavy Equipment Technician Apprentice — four-year course (eight weeks, eight weeks, eight weeks, eight weeks)
  • Automotive Service Technician Apprentice — four-year course (eight weeks, eight weeks, eight weeks, eight weeks)
  • Partsman Apprentice — three-year course (eight weeks, six weeks, six weeks)
  • Partsman WATS program (refer to the WATS explanation reported in 1995/99
  • Transport Refrigeration Mechanic Apprentice — three-year course (eight weeks, eight weeks, eight weeks)
  • Recreation Vehicle Mechanic Apprentice — three-year course (eight weeks, eight weeks, eight weeks)

2002: Ford Automotive Student Service Education Training (ASSET) started in March.

2002/03:

  • Aircraft Maintenance Engineers Technology — a two-year course
  • Aircraft Structures Repair and Overhaul — one year program, name changed to Aircraft Structures Technician in 2002/03
  • Avionics Technology — a two-year course
  • Aeronautical Engineers Technology program is not listed in the 2002/03 calendar
  • Automotive Service Technology — a two-year course
  • Heavy Equipment Technician — one year course
  • Business Administration — Automotive Marketing — three-year course (six academic semesters of which two are held at SAIT and four at Georgian College with four work terms)
  • Rail Traffic Control — a two-year course
  • Auto Body Technician Apprentice — Collison, three-year course (six weeks, six weeks, eight weeks); Refinishing, three-year course (six weeks, six weeks, four weeks); Collision and Refinishing, four-year course (six weeks, six weeks, eight weeks, four weeks)
  • Heavy Equipment Technician Apprentice — four-year course (eight weeks, eight weeks, eight weeks, eight weeks)
  • Automotive Service Technician Apprentice — four-year course (eight weeks, eight weeks, eight weeks, eight weeks)
  • Partsman Apprentice — three-year course (eight weeks, six weeks, six weeks)
  • Partsman WATS program (refer to the WATS explanation reported in 1995/99
  • Transport Refrigeration Mechanic Apprentice — three-year course (eight weeks, eight weeks, eight weeks)
  • Recreation Vehicle Mechanic Apprentice — three-year course (eight weeks, eight weeks, eight weeks)

2003-04:

  • Aircraft Maintenance Engineers Technology — a two-year course
  • Aircraft Structures Technician — a one-year course
  • Avionics Technology — a two-year course
  • Automotive Service Technology — a two-year course
  • Heavy Equipment Technician — one year course
  • Business Administration — Automotive Marketing — three-year course (six academic semesters of which two are held at SAIT and four at Georgian College and four work terms)
  • Railway Conductor — one year course (two, 16 week semesters)
  • Rail Traffic Control — a two-year course
  • Auto Body Technician Apprentice — Prepper, two year course (four weeks, zero weeks); Refinisher, two year course (four weeks, six weeks); Repairer, three year course (four weeks, seven weeks, seven weeks); Technician, four year course (four weeks, seven weeks, seven weeks, six weeks)
  • Heavy Equipment Technician Apprentice — four-year course (eight weeks, eight weeks, eight weeks, eight weeks)
  • Automotive Service Technician Apprentice — four-year course (eight weeks, eight weeks, eight weeks, eight weeks)
  • Partsman Apprentice — three-year course (eight weeks, six weeks, six weeks)
  • Partsman WATS program (refer to the WATS explanation reported in 1995/99
  • Transport Refrigeration Mechanic Apprentice — three-year course (eight weeks, eight weeks, eight weeks)
  • Recreation Vehicle Mechanic Apprentice — three-year course (eight weeks, eight weeks, eight weeks)

2004/05:

  • Aircraft Maintenance Engineers Technology — a two-year course
  • Aircraft Structures Technician — a one-year course
  • Avionics Technology — a two-year course
  • Automotive Service Technology — a two-year course
  • Heavy Equipment Technician — one year course
  • Business Administration — Automotive Marketing — three-year course (six academic semesters of which two are held at SAIT and four at Georgian College and four work terms)
  • Rail signals and Communications Maintenance — one year course
  • Railway Conductor — one year (two, 16 week semesters)
  • Rail Traffic Control — a two-year course
  • Auto Body Technician Apprentice — Prepper, two year course (four weeks, zero weeks); Refinisher, two year course (four weeks, six weeks); Repairer, three year course (four weeks, seven weeks, seven weeks); Technician, four year course (four weeks, seven weeks, seven weeks, six weeks)
  • Heavy Equipment Technician Apprentice — four-year course (eight weeks, eight weeks, eight weeks, eight weeks)
  • Automotive Service Technician Apprentice — four-year course (eight weeks, eight weeks, eight weeks, eight weeks)
  • Partsman Apprentice — three-year course (eight weeks, six weeks, six weeks)
  • Partsman WATS program (refer to the WATS explanation reported in 1995/99
  • Transport Refrigeration Mechanic Apprentice — three-year course (eight weeks, eight weeks, eight weeks)
  • Recreation Vehicle Mechanic Apprentice — three-year course (eight weeks, eight weeks, eight weeks)

2005/07:

  • Aircraft Maintenance Engineers Technology — a two-year course
  • Aircraft Structures Technician — a one-year course
  • Avionics Technology — a two-year course
  • Automotive Service Technology — a two-year course
  • Heavy Equipment Technician — one year course (name changed to Diesel Equipment Technician in 2008)

On March 17, 2006, SAIT receives approval from Alberta Advanced Education to offer the Business Administration Automotive Marketing program, effective July 1, 2006, as a (stand-alone) two-year diploma. SAIT students may complete their entire program at SAIT, no longer be required to continue their education at Georgian College.

  • Rail Signals and Communication Maintenance — one year course
  • Railway Conductor — a 17-week course
  • Rail Traffic Control — a two-year course
  • Auto Body Technician Apprentice — Prepper, two year course (four weeks, zero weeks); Refinisher, two year course (four weeks, six weeks); Repairer, three year course (four weeks, seven weeks, seven weeks); Technician, four year course (four weeks, seven weeks, seven weeks, six weeks)
  • Heavy Equipment Technician Apprentice — four-year course (eight weeks, eight weeks, eight weeks, eight weeks)
  • Automotive Service Technician Apprentice — four-year course (eight weeks, eight weeks, eight weeks, eight weeks)
  • Partsman Apprentice — three-year course (eight weeks, six weeks, six weeks)
  • Partsman WATS program (refer to the WATS explanation reported in 1995/99
  • Transport Refrigeration Mechanic Apprentice — three-year course (eight weeks, eight weeks, eight weeks)
  • Recreation Vehicle Mechanic Apprentice — three-year course (eight weeks, eight weeks, eight weeks)

2007: SAIT Management Council approved a motion to use "schools" instead of "departments" on May 11, 2007.

2008/10:

  • Aircraft Maintenance Engineers Technology — two-year course*

*In January 2009, SAIT expands enrolment by offering a January intake with 32 students, for a total of 96 first-year students. The January intake remains in effect until January 2016.

  • Aircraft Structures Technician — a one-year course
  • Avionics Technology — a two-year course
  • Automotive Service Technology — a two-year course
  • Diesel Equipment Technician — a one-year course

On April 14, 2009 SAIT receives approval from Alberta Advanced Education and Technology to change the name of the Business Administration Automotive Marketing program to Business Administration Automotive Management, effective July 1, 2009.

  • Railway Conductor — a 17-week course
  • Auto Body Technician Apprentice — Prepper, two year course (four weeks, zero weeks); Refinisher, two year course (four weeks, six weeks); Repairer, three year course (four weeks, seven weeks, seven weeks); Technician, four year course (four weeks, seven weeks, seven weeks, six weeks)
  • Heavy Equipment Technician Apprentice — four-year course (eight weeks, eight weeks, eight weeks, eight weeks)
  • Automotive Service Technician Apprentice — four-year course (eight weeks, eight weeks, eight weeks, eight weeks)
  • Partsman Apprentice — three-year course (eight weeks, six weeks, six weeks)
  • Partsman WATS program (refer to the WATS explanation reported in 1995/99 — The number of weeks of training changed from the previous eight weeks in first year and six weeks in second and their year (eight weeks, six weeks, six weeks) to six weeks in first year, eight weeks in the second year and six weeks in the third year (six weeks, eight weeks, six weeks) in 2008/09.
  • Transport Refrigeration Mechanic Apprentice — three-year course (eight weeks, eight weeks, eight weeks)
  • Recreation Vehicle Mechanic Apprentice — three years (eight weeks, eight weeks, eight weeks)

2010/16:

  • Aircraft Maintenance Engineers Technology — a two-year course
  • Aircraft Structures Technician — a one-year course
  • Avionics Technology — a two-year course
  • Automotive Service Technology — two-year course*

In September 2014, the *Automotive Service Technology program expands (one-time only) to 96 first-year students.

  • Diesel Equipment Technician — a one-year course
  • Business Administration — Automotive Management - a two-year course
  • Railway Conductor — a 15-week course
  • Auto Body Technician Apprentice — Prepper, two-year course (four weeks of technical training); Refinisher, two-year course (four weeks, six weeks); Repairer, three-year course (four weeks, seven weeks, seven weeks)
  • Heavy Equipment Technician Apprentice — four year course (eight weeks, eight weeks, eight weeks, eight weeks); Off Road, three year course (eight weeks, eight weeks, eight weeks); Truck and Transport, three year course (eight weeks, eight weeks, eight weeks); Transport Trailer, two year course (eight weeks, zero weeks)
  • Automotive Service Technician Apprentice — four-year course (eight weeks, eight weeks, eight weeks, eight weeks)
  • Parts Technician Apprentice — three-year course (six weeks, eight weeks, six weeks)
  • Partsman WATS program (refer to 1995/99)
  • Transport Refrigeration Technician Apprentice — three-year course (eight weeks, eight weeks, eight weeks)
  • Recreation Vehicle Service Technician Apprentice — three-year course (eight weeks, eight weeks, eight weeks)

2015/17: Aircraft Maintenance Engineers Technology program reduces its enrolment to a September intake with 64 first-year students. There is no January intake.

Automotive Service Technology program sees the largest graduating class of 2016 with 68 students in the spring convocation.

Dressmaking and Millinery Program History

History of Dressmaking and Millinery Program

Date: Nov. 23, 2016

By the end of the second year of operations at the Provincial Institute of Technology and Art (PITA) in May 1918, Household Arts for Teachers was a daytime offering.

The two-year Industrial Dressmaking and Millinery program was first offered in 1922/23 with 21 students enrolled. The Annual Announcement noted the program "is also designed to train girls to act as capable sales-ladies and to also be qualified to take charge of a ladies' department in a store, and qualify them to become capable buyers." The curriculum included shop work, textiles and materials, colour and design, mathematics, physics, chemistry, English, costume and hat design, the economics of buying and selling, drawing and bookkeeping.

Quarters on the second floor fo the new Main Building (today's Heritage Hall) were designated for the Household Economics Department. enrolment by 1925/26 had grown to 43 students. The Annual Announcement that year featured photos of costumes, gowns, hats and artificial flowers made in the program.

New five-week Find Yourself courses in July - August 1926 included classes in needlework (plain sewing, dressmaking) and household art (cooking, home management); 17 attended dressmaking classes. Find Yourself sewing courses continued for several summers.

Three industrial Dressmaking and Millinery diplomas were issues in 1929/30. In 1931/32 the curriculum added classes in foods and nutrition and health education.

Among the required textbooks in the mid - the 1930s was Vocational Arithmetic for girls. The 1939/40 Annual Announcement description included this stipulation: "Each student is required to cut, fit and finish at least two garments for large or disproportionate figures."

This program (along with the Art Department) relocated to Coste House, a mansion in the Mount Royal district, in August 1940 when the PITA campus was taken over to serve as the No. 2 Wireless School of the Royal Canadian Air Force. The programs would not move back to the North Hill campus until the summer of 1946.

The program name changed to Industrial Dressmaking and Commercial Cooking in 1947/48. The first year included both streams; students then chose either dressmaking or cooking studies for the second year. enrolment s reached highs of 45-day programs in 1947/48 and 116 evening students in 1949/50.

In 1949/50 the program became two separate entities: Dressmaking, and Restaurant Management — a new one year program.

1953/54 saw two Clothing and Design programs offered:

  • Dressmaking and Tailoring — one year
  • Fashion Design and Drafting — two years; common first-year with Dressmaking and Tailoring

The clothing and Design programs were not listed in the academic calendar after 1959/60, although a sewing short course (150 hours) continued to be offered. In the early 1990s, SAIT discontinued offering general interest courses that weren't geared toward careers.

Hospitality and Tourism History

History of Hospitality and Tourism

Date: Dec. 5, 2016

SAIT's presence in the hospitality and tourism industry can be traced to 1947/48 when the two-year Industrial Dressmaking and Millinery program changed its focus — and name — to Industrial Dressmaking and Commercial Cooking. The first year included both streams; students then chose either dressmaking or cooking studies for the second year.

In 1949/50 cooking studies became a separate one-year program, renamed Restaurant Management with 13 students enrolled.

1952/53 saw a name change to Food Service Training and an industrial advisory committee was established in 1955/56. Another renaming — to Food Service Management — occurred in 1958/59. The program was discontinued after 1961/62.

The Cook Apprenticeship program launched in 1957/58.

The 1960s saw a significant expansion with a number of new programs added:

  • Dining Room Service (10-week course) in 1962/63. It became a nine-week course in 1963/64 and then six weeks in 1975/76 when it was renamed Professional Restaurant Service.
  • Commercial Cooking for Restaurants and Institutions (two-year course) in 1962/63.
  • Baker Apprenticeship and Hotel, Motel and Restaurant Administration (two-year course) in 1966/67; the latter was initially under the jurisdiction of the Business Education Department.
  • Commercial Baking (two-year course) and Short Order and Specialty Cooking (one year) in 1967/68.
  • Commercial Baking became a one-year program in 1969/70.

In 1970/71, the Baker Apprenticeship was no longer listed as a SAIT offering but was reinstated in 1987/88. That same year also saw the following programs under the Hospitality Careers Department:

  • Food and Beverage Service (formerly Professional Restaurant Service)
  • Hotel and Restaurant Management
  • Retail Meat Cutting (today's Butchery and Charcuterie Management) began in 1982/83
  • Professional Cooking
  • Cook Apprenticeship

Pastry Chef (today's Baking and Pastry Arts) launched in 2000/01.

A Tourism major was introduced to the Hotel and Restaurant Administration in 1973/74. It became a stand-alone two-year program — Tourism Administration — in 1980/81, with a Travel Counselling option. In 1984/85, Travel Counselling became a separate program. It was redesigned as a one-year certificate in 1993/94. Graduates could also take evening classes to earn a Travel Management Diploma.

On March 1, 2007, the Business and Tourism Department became two separate entities. SAIT Management Council formally approved the redesignation of academic departments as "schools", including the School Hospitality and Tourism, and the School of Business on May 11, 2007.

Today, SAIT Hospitality and Tourism graduates can be found working in major establishments around the world. The School operates numerous on-campus retail and dining outlets as well as a student-run travel centre — all "live" classrooms providing unique hands-on learning.

History of Railroad Station Agents Course

Railroad Station Agents Course

In Alberta's early years, railways were a vital means of transport — for people and for freight. Railway lines crisscrossed the province and the railway station was a fixture of even the smallest communities. The Provincial Institute of Technology and Art played an important role in training railroad station personnel.

Telegraphy was one of several training programs offered to returning World War One veterans in 1917/18 and a Telegraphy evening course launched in 1920/21 with an enrolment of 34 students. It entailed 40 lessons over a two-year period. The course material covered telegraph rules and rates and railroad station duties required of an operator.

The Railway Station Agents two-year day program first ran in 1924/25 with 15 students enrolled. Curriculum listed in the 1925/26 Annual Announcement includes first-year classes in operator and railroad work, electrical theory and shop as well as related subjects. The emphasis was on freight movement. The second year focused on passenger traffic with training in telegraphy and other technical and customer service topics.

Both day and evening courses continued through 1931/32 when they were cancelled. enrolment peaked in 1928/29 with 40 daytime students and 53 evening students in classes. 

History of Tractor Department

Tractor Department History

Photograph of students of the tractor course at SAITAgriculture has been a dominant force in Alberta's economy from early settlement days. The Provincial Institute of Technology and Art (PITA) responded to industry need with agricultural equipment mechanical training beginning in 1917/18, the institute's second year of operation.

Demand was high: enrolment in the eight-month Tractor Engineering course in 1920/21 was 25 students; another 59 students registered for the five-week special Tractor Courses.

Offerings continued to expand throughout the decade. Farm Mechanics (three weeks) was delivered on a trial basis in 1921/22 and a five-month Farm Construction and Mechanics course ran for the first time in 1925/26. It proved popular with 47 students in 1928/29. That same year, enrolment in the Tractor Engineering and Special Tractor courses totalled 352 daytime students and 14 students in evening classes.

Large enrolment s created the need for more training space. An addition in 1928 included an amphitheatre to seat 250 students. It was known as "The Bullpen."

The Great Depression of the 1930s took its toll on agriculture — and on PITA. The Tractor Engineering, Special Tractor, and Farm Construction and Mechanics courses were all cancelled between 1932 and 1936.

A new five-week course, Diesel Engines, launched in 1935/36 with 122 students. By the end of the decade, the Farm Construction and Mechanics and Tractors courses had been reinstated. 

The 1940s brought further refinements. Farm Construction and Mechanics was last offered in 1941/42. Tractor Mechanics came to an end in 1946/47, replaced by Agricultural Mechanics.

1968/69 marked the end of an era: that was the last year SAIT delivered the Agricultural Mechanics program; it subsequently moved to Olds College.

History of Construction, Woodworking and Structural

Construction, Woodworking and Structural History

Department History: 1923/24 - 1966/67

Woodworking: 1923 - 1956/57

Construction: 1957/58 - 1964/65

Structural: 1965/66 - 1966/67

In 1967/68, all departments were assigned three-letter designation codes for subject and class designations.

This document is primarily a history of the day courses. Information on apprenticeship and evening courses is included, when available.

1921/22:

  • Building Construction was taught to Architectural Drafting students in the day course
  • Evening course enrolment in Building Construction had 12 students. The course wasn't listed in the Annual Announcement.

1922/23:

  • Building Construction and Estimating and Woodworking Shop subjects were included in Architectural Drafting day course
  • Building Construction staff included one person
  • Evening classes designed to assist those already engaged in the industry by supplementing their practical work in the instruction in the technical and theoretical branches of their trade or a closely allied one. Courses in the Annual Announcement will be organized if there is sufficient demand. No courses will be organized in competition with those conducted by the local School board. Students in the regular day courses may enrol for evening classes with the approval of their instructors.
  • No Construction evening course listed in the Annual Announcement.

1923/24:

  • Building Construction and Estimating and Woodworking Shop subjects were included in Architectural Drafting day course
  • No Construction staff listed in the Annual Announcement
  • Evening classes designed to assist those already engaged in the industry by supplementing their practical work in the instruction in the technical and theoretical branches of their trade or a closely allied one. Courses in the Annual Announcement will be organized if there is sufficient demand. No courses will be organized in competition with those conducted by the local School board. Students in the regular day courses may enrol for evening classes with the approval of their instructors.
  • No Construction evening course listed in the Annual Announcement.

1924/25 to 1925/26:

  • Building Construction and Estimating and Woodworking Shop subjects were included in Architectural Drafting day course
  • Day courses in Building Trades (Woodworking, Plumbing, Bricklaying), Industrial Art, Motion Picture Operation, Oxy-Acetylene Welding, Machine Shop, Vulcanizing and Farm Machinery may be organized when the need is shown
  • No Construction staff listed in the Annual Announcement
  • Evening courses listed in the Annual Announcement will be organized if there is sufficient enrollment, a minimum of twelve is required.
  • No Construction evening course listed in the Annual Announcement

In July 1926 the shops at the Institute were opened for a five-week period in which practical shop courses were offered. Courses were on a half day lesson basis and instruction was entirely practical, not lectures. Courses offered — Woodworking (Carpentry and Cabinet Making), Electricity, Automobiles, as Engine and Smithing, Machine Shop Practice, Drafting, Art Needle-work and Household Art.

"Students are advised to take two courses so that the monotony of working full time in one shop may be avoided." Shop Courses, Summer Announcement July 5, 1926, to August 6, 1926.

"The offering of these courses was experimental. The interest and initial attendance have quite definitely indicated that there is a file here worth cultivation, particularly among younger people who are desirous of learning, whether they have the aptitude to warrant their deciding upon a mechanical vocation." Annual Announcement 1926/27 with 53 students enrolled.

1927/28:

  • Building Construction and Estimating and Woodworking Shop subjects were included in Architectural Drafting day course
  • Day courses in Building Trades (Woodworking, Plumbing, Bricklaying), Industrial Art, Motion Picture Operation, Oxy-Acetylene Welding, Machine Shop, Vulcanizing and Farm Machinery may be organized when the need is shown
  • No Construction staff listed in the Annual Announcement
  • Evening courses listed in the Annual Announcement will be organized if there is sufficient enrollment, a minimum of twelve is required.
  • No Construction evening course listed in the Annual Announcement

Summer school of the Institute (July 25, 1927, to August 12, 1927): The purpose of these courses was to give an opportunity to young people to use a portion of a long holiday period in a useful way in which they might gain experience that would assist them in intelligently choosing a vocation. These courses have been called, "Find Yourself" Courses'.  Annual Announcement in 1927/28.

Courses offered were in woodworking, electricity, motor cars, machine shop, gas engines, art, drafting, cooking and sewing.  All of the courses offered were given with the exception of the course on gas engines with 51 students enrolled.

1928/29:

  • Building Construction and Estimating and Woodworking Shop subjects were included in Architectural Drafting day course
  • Day courses in Building Trades (Woodworking, Plumbing, Bricklaying), Motion Picture Operation and Vulcanizing may be organized when the need is shown
  • No Construction staff listed in the Annual Announcement
  • Evening courses listed in the Annual Announcement will be organized if there is sufficient enrollment, a minimum of twelve is required.
  • No Construction evening course listed in the Annual Announcement
  • Evening course enrolment in Woodworking was 28 students

Summer School 1928: Shop courses were offered in Gas Engine Shop, Machine Shop, Electric Shop, Woodworking Shop, Automobile Shop, Drafting, Art, Sewing and Cooking with 57 students enrolled.

1929/30:

  • Building Construction and Estimating and Woodworking Shop subjects were included in Architectural Drafting day course
  • Day courses in Building Trades (Woodworking, Plumbing, Bricklaying), Motion Picture Operation and Vulcanizing may be organized when the need is shown
  • No Construction staff listed in the Annual Announcement
  • Evening courses listed in the Annual Announcement will be organized if there is sufficient enrollment, a minimum of twelve is required.
  • No Construction evening course listed in the Annual Announcement
  • Estimating for Builders evening course enrolment was 17 students
  • Carpentry evening course enrolment was 14 students

Summer School 1929: Shop courses were offered in Gas Engine Shop, Machine Shop, Electric Shop, Woodworking Shop, Automobile Shop, Drafting, Art, Sewing and Cooking. Summer classes were still listed in the announcement but there is no record of there being enough to form a class. No summer sessions were held again until 1935, as it was felt that since most of the students were from high school they already had enough classroom confinement and wanted to be outside in the nice summer weather.

1930/31:

  • Building Construction and Estimating and Woodworking Shop subjects were included in Architectural Drafting day course
  • Day courses in Building Trades (Woodworking, Plumbing, Bricklaying), Motion Picture Operation, and Vulcanizing may be organized when the need is shown
  • Carpentry day course staffed one
  • Construction evening courses offered: Carpentry with 36 lessons
  • Estimating for Builders with 20 lessons

1931/32 to 1932/33:

  • Building Construction and Estimating and Woodworking Shop subjects were included in Architectural Drafting day course
  • Day courses in Building Trades (Woodworking, Plumbing, Bricklaying), Motion Picture Operation, and Vulcanizing may be organized when the need is shown
  • Construction evening courses offered: Carpentry (72 hours)
  • Estimating for Builders (40 hours)
  • Carpentry day course staffed one

1933/34:

  • Building Construction and Estimating and Woodworking Shop subjects were included in Architectural Drafting day course
  • Day courses in Building Trades (Woodworking, Plumbing, Bricklaying), Motion Picture Operation, and Vulcanizing may be organized when the need is shown
  • No staff listed for Construction day courses in the Annual Announcement
  • Art was the only evening class offered from 1933/34 to 1936/37

1934/35: Day course offered in Building Construction and Drafting (two years, 900 hours per year). This is a course in building construction and drafting for young men employed, or seeking employment, in any branch of the building industry. In addition to providing the background of information needed by any good artisan, it offers valuable training to those wishing to become draftsmen, estimators, inspectors, superintendents or master builders, as well as giving good preliminary instruction on architectural work.

  • Each student provides this equipment: Good set drafting instruments, 12 in. triangular boxwood scale, 60° and 45° triangles, drawing ink
  • Building Construction enrolment with seven-day students
  • No staff for Construction day courses listed in the Annual Announcement

1935/36: Day course offered in Building Construction and Drafting (two years, 900 hours per year)

  • Each student provides this equipment: Good set drafting instruments, 12 in. triangular boxwood scale, 60° and 45° triangles, drawing ink
  • Building Construction enrolment with eight-day students
  • No staff for Construction day courses listed in the Annual Announcement

1936/37: Day course offered in Building Construction and Drafting (two years, 900 hours per year)

  • Each student provides this equipment: Good set drafting instruments, 12 in. triangular boxwood scale, 60° and 45° triangles, drawing ink
  • Building Construction enrolment with seven-day students
  • Building Construction staffed one

The Provincial Government enacted the Tradesman's Qualification Act; the first province to have such legislation. It set out attainment standards of proficiency in some designated trades. The Act did not make provision for training, at this time, it only set trade standards. A Provincial Apprenticeship Board was established by the Act, to administer and regulate the trades. This also included the appointment of local advisory committees. Journeyman's status was to be established when tradesmen were able to pass practical and written examinations.

1937/38: Day courses offered in Building Construction and Drafting (two years, 900 hours per week) and General Shop (one year, 900 hours). General Shop is a one-year course designed to prepare certified teachers to conduct the activity called General Shop in the Course of Study for the Intermediate School.

  • Courses in Building Trades (Woodworking, Plumbing, Bricklaying), Industrial Art, Motion Picture Operation and Vulcanizing may be organized when the need is shown
  • Building Construction staffed one
  • Each student provides this equipment: Good set drafting instruments, 12 in. triangular boxwood scale, 60° and 45° triangles, drawing ink
  • Building Construction and Drafting enrolment was 18-day students

1938/39: Day courses offered in Building Construction and Drafting (two years, 900 hours per week).

  • Each student provides this equipment: Good set drafting instruments, 12 in. triangular boxwood scale, 60° and 45° triangles, drawing ink
  • Building Construction and General Shop staffed one
  • Building Construction and Drafting enrolment was 12-day students

The Tech Art Record (Year Book) was dedicated to Mr. Lindley Henry Bennett, who was in his last year on the staff of the Institute where he had been since it opened in 1916. He was an early pioneer in technical education in Canada, originally from England he was recruited in 1899 to work with the MacDonald Manual Training Plan, and after brief work in the province of Quebec, he came to the North West Territories to take up his duties as regional director of the MacDonald Plan in Calgary. During his 23 years with the Institute, he had served in a number of positions including Head of the Drafting Department and later Head of the Building Construction Department.

1939/40: Day courses offered in Building Construction and Drafting (two years, 900 hours per week).

  • Each student provides this equipment: Good set drafting instruments, 12 in. triangular boxwood scale, 60° and 45° triangles, drawing ink
  • Building Construction and General Shop staffed one
  • Building Construction and Drafting enrolment was 13-day students

Chief Instructors (Department Heads):

  • Tractor: J.K MacKenzie
  • Building Construction: M.J Tomlinson
  • Drafting: L.E Pearson
  • Electrical: F.N Rhodes
  • Dressmaking & Millinery: C.E Smith (Miss)
  • Science & Math: F.G Young
  • Machine Shop: E.W Wood
  • Motor: A.C Wagner
  • Aeronautics: A.A Peebles
  • Art: H.G Glyde
  • Correspondence: Alex Higgins

1940/41: Day courses offered in Building Construction and Drafting (two years, 900 hours). General Shop (one year course for teachers only, 900 hours).

General Shop was designed to prepare certified teachers to conduct the activity called General Shop in the Course of Study for the Intermediate School. For those who wish to specialize in this type of instruction, this course provides the necessary introduction.

  • Building Construction and General Shop Chief Instructor: M.J Tomlinson
  • Evening Carpentry course was 72 hours
  • Building Construction enrolment was 6-day students

1941/42: Day courses offered in Building Construction and Drafting (two years, 900 hours). General Shop (one year course for teachers only, 900 hours).

  • Building Construction and General Shop Chief Instructor: M.J Tomlinson
  • Evening courses offered in Carpentry (72 hours) and Estimating for Builders (72 hours)
  • Building Construction and Drafting enrolment was 3-day students
  • Carpentry evening course enrolment was 10 students
  • Building Trades evening enrolment was 22 students
  • Estimating evening enrolment was 15 students

1942/43: Day courses offered in Building Construction and Drafting (two years, 900 hours). General Shop (one year course for teachers only, 900 hours).

  • Building Construction and General Shop Chief Instructor: M.J Tomlinson
  • Evening courses offered in Carpentry (72 hours) and Estimating for Builders (72 hours)
  • Carpentry enrolment was 2-day students

1943/44: Day courses offered in Building Construction and Drafting (two years, 900 hours). General Shop (one year course for teachers only, 900 hours).

  • Building Construction and General Shop Chief Instructor: M.J Tomlinson
  • Evening courses offered in Carpentry (72 hours) and Estimating for Builders (72 hours)
  • General Shop enrolment was one day student
  • Carpentry enrolment was 22 students (four days, 18 students)
  • Building Construction and Drafting enrolment was 3-day students

1944/45: Day courses offered in Building Construction and Drafting (two years, 900 hours). General Shop (one year course for teachers only, 900 hours).

  • Building Construction and General Shop Chief Instructor: M.J Tomlinson
  • Evening courses offered in Blue Print Reading (72 hours), Carpentry (72 hours) and Estimating for Builders (72 hours)
  • Carpentry evening course enrolment was 35 students
  • Building Construction and Drafting enrolment was 23 students (12 days, 11 evenings)

1946/47: Day courses offered in Building Construction and Drafting (two years, 900 hours). General Shop (one year course for teachers only, 900 hours).

  • Building Construction and General Shop Chief Instructor: M.J Tomlinson
  • Evening courses offered in Blue Print Reading (72 hours), Carpentry (72 hours) and Estimating for Builders (72 hours)
  • Each student shall provide a good set of drafting instruments, 12m triangular boxwood scale, 60° and 45⁰ set squares, drawing ink, one 6ft. "Mezurall" Lufkin Pocket Tape and two shop aprons
  • Building Construction and Drafting enrolment was 47 students (36 days, 11 evenings)
  • Woodwork evening course enrolment was 23 students
  • Carpentry evening course was 29 students

1947/48: Day courses offered in Building Construction and Drafting (two years, 900 hours).

  • Each student shall provide: A good set of drafting instruments, 12m triangular boxwood scale, 60° and 45⁰ set squares, drawing ink, one 6 ft. "Mezurall" Lufkin Pocket Tape and two shop aprons
  • Evening courses offered in Blue Print Reading (72 hours), Carpentry (72 hours), Estimating for Building (72 hours) and Woodwork (72 hours)
  • Building Construction and Drafting enrolment was 53 students (36 days, 17 evenings)
  • Woodwork evening course enrolment was 12 students

The training for apprentices under the new Apprenticeship Act began at the Provincial Institute of Technology and Art in May 1948. These programs for Auto Body, Auto Mechanics, Carpenters, Radio Technicians and Electrical Apprentices commenced after the regular classes had ended for the year.

1948/49: Day courses offered in Building Construction and Drafting (two years, 900 hours).

  • Building Construction Chief Instructor: M.J Tomlinson
  • Evening courses offered in Blue Print Reading (72 hours), Carpentry (72 hours), Estimating for Building (72 hours)
  • Woodwork enrolment was 23 students (four days, 19 evenings)
  • Carpentry evening enrolment was 37 students

Up to this time scholarships had been made available to students in the Art programs, now five new scholarships were awarded for the following programs:

  • Industrial Electricity — $150 by Robinson Electric
  • Machine Shop — $150 by Canadian Natural Gas Co.
  • Survey Drafting — $150 by Canadian Natural Gas Co.
  • Building Construction — $100 by Manning Egleston Lumber Co.
  • Best all-round student — $100 by British Empire Service League

1949/50: Day courses offered in Building Construction and Drafting (two years, 900 hours).

  • Building Construction Chief Instructor: M.J Tomlinson
  • Evening courses offered in Blue Print Reading (72 hours), Carpentry (72 hours), Estimating for Building (72 hours) and Woodwork (72 hours)
  • Apprenticeship in Carpentry
  • Building Construction and Drafting enrolment was 40 students (20 days, 20 evenings)
  • Woodwork evening enrolment was 42 students (four days, 19 evenings)
  • Carpentry evening enrolment was 27 students
  • Carpentry apprentice enrolment was 24 students

1950/51: Day courses offered in Building Construction and Drafting (two years, 900 hours).

  • Building Construction Chief Instructor: M.J Tomlinson
  • Evening courses offered in Estimating for Builders (72 hours), Woodwork (72 hours) and Carpentry (72 hours)
  • Apprenticeship in Carpentry
  • Building Construction and Drafting enrolment was 39 students (20 days, 19 evenings)
  • Carpentry evening enrolment was 41 students
  • Woodwork evening enrolment was 44 students
  • Estimating for Builders evening enrolment was 22 students
  • Carpentry Apprentice enrolment was 39 students

1951/52: Day courses offered in Building Construction and Drafting (two years, 900 hours).

  • Building Construction Chief Instructor: M.J Tomlinson
  • Evening courses offered in Estimating for Builders (72 hours), Woodwork (72 hours) and Carpentry (72 hours)
  • Apprenticeship in Carpentry
  • Building Construction and Drafting enrolment was 48 students (27 days, 21 evenings)
  • Carpentry evening enrolment was 35 students
  • Woodwork evening enrolment was 44 students
  • Estimating for Builders evening enrolment was 14 students
  • Carpentry Apprentice enrolment was 42 students

1952/53: Day courses offered in Building Construction and Architectural Drafting (two years, 900 hours per week).

  • Building Construction Chief Instructor: M.J Tomlinson
  • Evening courses offered in Estimating for Builders (72 hours), Woodwork (72 hours) and Carpentry (72 hours)

During 1949, the Provincial Department of Education and the Apprenticeship Board of Alberta jointly agreed to gradually transfer the technical training of apprentices from Canadian Vocational Training to the Provincial Institute of Technology and Art. Accordingly, in furtherance of this plan, the first groups of apprentices commenced technical training classes at the Institute in the school year 1948/49. During the school, 1951/52 apprentices from the following trades attended the institute: Automobile Mechanics, Auto Body Repairs, Carpenters, Electricians, Radio Technicians, Refrigeration and Sheet Metal. The list of trades will be gradually increased until apprentices from all designated trades receive their technical training at the institute. (1951/52 Calendar)

  • Apprenticeship in Carpentry
  • Building Construction and Drafting enrolment was 34 students
  • Carpentry evening enrolment was 51 students
  • Woodwork evening enrolment was 40 students
  • Estimating for Builders evening enrolment was 19 students
  • Blue Print Reading evening course enrolment was 26 students
  • Carpentry Apprentice enrolment was 66 students

Construction of the new "B" buildings was completed in time for fall classes. The official opening ceremonies were held January 6, 1953. This modern building was the largest addition to the campus since 1922. It was designed to accommodate several large shops for the Automotives on the south side of the building and shops and classrooms for the Building Construction on the north side. Staff offices and a concrete test lab, facility were also included. New modern equipment was installed in the shops which provided for a major update in this training programs.

1953/54: Day courses offered in Building Construction and Architectural Drafting (two years, 900 hours per week).

  • Building Construction Chief Instructor: M.J Tomlinson
  • Evening courses offered in Estimating for Builders (72 hours), Woodwork (72 hours) and Carpentry (72 hours)
  • Apprenticeship in Carpentry
  • Carpentry Apprentice enrolment was 120 students
  • Estimating for Builders evening enrolment was 24 students
  • Carpentry course enrolment was 47 students
  • Woodwork evening enrolment was 70 students

In 1953 there were only two technical institutes in Canada: the four-year-old Ryerson Institute of Technology in Toronto and the 37-year old Provincial Institute of Technology and Art in Calgary. It was decided, after a meeting between the two Principals of these institutes, that the use of the term "Technologist" should be promoted as having a unique significance in Canada to denote a graduate of a two-year program at a technical institute. The term "Technician" should be reserved for the graduate of a one-year course.

Commercial Wireless Operating and the Refrigeration classes were moved to the old RCAF Mess Hall which was now designated as the "E" building. Drafting and the Building Construction Departments were already located in the building.

1954/55: Day courses offered in Building Construction and Architectural Drafting (two years, 900 hours per week).

  • Building Construction Chief Instructor: M.J Tomlinson
  • Evening courses offered in Estimating for Builders (72 hours), Woodwork (72 hours) and Carpentry (72 hours)
  • Apprenticeship in Carpentry
  • Carpentry Apprentice enrolment was 84 students
  • Building Construction and Drafting enrolment was 27 students
  • Blue Print Reading evening course enrolment was 22 students
  • Carpentry evening course enrolment was 38 students
  • Woodwork evening course enrolment was 58 students
  • Estimating for Builders evening course enrolment was 27 students
  • Concrete Technology evening course enrolment was 48 students

1955/56: The Building Construction and Architectural Drafting courses were split into two separate new programs: Architectural Drafting Technology and Building Technology. Day course offered in Building Technology (two years, 900 hours per week).

  • Evening courses offered in Estimating for Builders (72 hours), Woodwork (72 hours) and Carpentry (72 hours)
  • Building Technology enrolment was 6-day students
  • Carpenter's Special (N.W.T) enrolment was 15-day students
  • Carpentry evening course enrolment was 65 students
  • Estimating for Builders evening course enrolment was 22 students
  • Woodworking evening course enrolment was 52 students
  • Blue Print Reading evening course enrolment was 49 students
  • Concrete Technology evening course enrolment was 12 students
  • Carpentry Apprentice enrolment was 108 students

The instructional staff now totalled 81, with the Department Heads listed as follows:

  • Aeronautics: W.A.B Saunders
  • Art: I.H Kerr
  • Automotives: F.B Wayne
  • Building Technology: M.J Tomlinson
  • Drafting: G.R Howarth
  • Electricity: D.C Fleming
  • Electronics: W. Partin
  • Clothing & Food: R.A Denny (Mrs.)
  • Machine Shop: G. Kingsep
  • Math & English: F.G Young
  • Science: N. Safran
  • Agricultural: J.K MacKenzie
  • Correspondence: J.A Middleton

1956/57: Day course offered in Construction Technology (formerly Business Technology — two years, 900 hours).

  • Building Technology Department head: M.J Tomlinson
  • Evening courses offered in Estimating for Builders (72 hours), Woodwork (72 hours) and Carpentry (72 hours)
  • Apprenticeship in Carpentry
  • Advisory Committee for Construction Technology was established for the first time
  • Construction Technology enrolment was 14-day students
  • Woodwork evening course enrolment was 58 students
  • Carpentry evening course enrolment was 52 students
  • Estimating for builders evening course enrolment was 24 students
  • Blue Print Reading evening course enrolment was 52 students
  • Carpentry apprentice enrolment was 149 students

1957/58: Day course offered in Construction Technology (two years).

  • Building Technology Department head: M.J Tomlinson
  • Apprenticeship in Carpentry
  • Construction Technology enrolment was 14-day students
  • Estimating for builders evening course enrolment was 47 students
  • Blue Print Reading evening course enrolment was 49 students
  • Carpentry evening course enrolment was 26 students
  • Carpentry apprentice enrolment was 189 students

This was the fourth year in which the Construction Department built a house in the large shop. The house (24 x 40ft.) built, as a student training project, was ready to be moved onto a private lot. It was reported that the owner had saved $3,000 in construction costs.

1958/59: Day course offered in Construction Technology (two years).

  • Construction Department head: M.J Tomlinson
  • Apprenticeship in Carpentry
  • Construction Technology enrolment was 23-day students
  • Woodwork evening course enrolment was 34 students
  • Estimating for builders evening course enrolment was 34 students
  • Blue Print Reading evening course enrolment was 35 students
  • Carpentry evening course enrolment was 58 students
  • Carpentry apprentice enrolment was 215 students

1959/60: Day course offered in Construction Technology (two years).

  • Construction Department head: M.J Tomlinson
  • Apprenticeship in Carpentry
  • Construction Technology enrolment was 23-day students
  • Woodwork evening course enrolment was 34 students
  • Estimating for builders evening course enrolment was 34 students
  • Blue Print Reading evening course enrolment was 35 students
  • Carpentry evening course enrolment was 58 students
  • Carpentry apprentice enrolment was 215 students

1960/61: Day course offered in Construction Technology (two years).

  • Construction Department head: M.J Tomlinson
  • Apprenticeship in Carpentry
  • Construction Technology enrolment was 51-day students
  • Woodwork evening course enrolment was 51 students
  • Blue Print Reading evening course enrolment was 35 students
  • Carpentry evening course enrolment was 19 students
  • Carpentry apprentice enrolment was 201 students

For the benefit of adults in Calgary and district, the Institute provides an extensive programme of Evening classes. These are usually operated one or two evenings per week from early October until April. Before any class is organized there must be a minimum enrolment of fifteen students. For complete details, consult the Evening Class Announcement, which is available by phoning A Venue 9-2244.

December 24, 1960, the name of the Institute was officially changed to Southern Alberta Institute of Technology (SAIT), the Art Department became The Alberta College of Art (ACA).

1961/62: Day course offered in Construction Technology (two years).

  • Construction Department head: M.J Tomlinson
  • Apprenticeship in Carpentry
  • Evening course enrolment s no longer listed in "Blue Book" or in Annual Announcements
  • Construction Technology enrolment was 22-day students

Conditions of admission were upgraded for a number of programs, and for the first time, the Institute training programs were set up in several divisions:

1. Technical Insitute Divison

  • Engineering Technician courses — applicants must have 100 Alberta credits with a "B" standing in Math. 30 or 32, Science 20 and English 20
  • Aeronautical Engineering
  • Architectural Technology
  • Land Surveying Technology
  • Petroleum Technology
  • Power Plant Engineering
  • Radio and Electronic Technology

2. Technician Courses

  • Applicants must have 67 Alberta credits with a "B" standing in Math
  • Aircraft Maintenance Technology
  • Drafting Technology
  • Industrial Electrical Technology
  • Mechanical Technology
  • Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Technology
  • Automotive Service Technology
  • Commercial Radio Operating
  • Construction Technology — Merchandising Administration

3. Academic staff now reported as a total of 144. There was 45 support staff.

1962/63: Day course offered in Construction Technology (two years).

  • Construction Department head: M.J Tomlinson
  • Apprenticeship in Carpentry
  • Construction Technology enrolment was 33-day students

1963/64: Day course offered in Construction Technology (two years). During the year 1963/64 apprentices from the following trades attended the Southern Alberta Institute of Technology — Auto Body Repair, Carpentry, Cooking, Electrical, Heavy Duty Mechanics, Machine Shop, Motor Mechanics, Plumbing, Radio, Refrigeration, Sheet Metal and Welding.

  • Construction Department head: M.J Tomlinson
  • Construction Technology enrolment was 42-day students
  • Academic staff now totalled 174
  • Name of the Annual Announcement was changed to the Annual Calendar

1964/65: Day course offered in Construction Technology (two years).

  • Construction Department head: M.J Tomlinson
  • Apprenticeship in Carpentry
  • Construction Technology enrolment was 40-day students

1965/66:

In Alberta, a new vocational high school system was developed which was intended to provide a higher level of interest in technical education for the senior grades. The courses to be taught there were modelled on some of the Institute's first-year programs and would be included in the vocational courses for grade X, XI and XII curriculum. SAIT and NAIT were to receive the graduates from these programs and grant them direct entry to the second year of new "articulated" programs. It became evident that entry into the existing two-year programs would not well serve these students. A number of new three-year Institute programs were devised which would be articulated with the new Vocational High Schools. These were dubbed the "A", "B" and "C" year programs to distinguish them from the regular two-year courses which were to continue for the time being. Regular academic high school grade XI or XII students would be required to enter the "A" level. Several of the Institute's Departments were required to articulate, in this manner, including the programs in Electrical, Mechanical, Drafting, Refrigeration & Air Conditioning, Architectural, Construction and Electronics.

Day courses offered in Structural Technology (articulated program - Construction Technology) as a three-year program. Structural Technology (formerly known as Construction Technology) as a two-year program.

  • In 1965, the "B" Building (now the "B" Wing of Thomas Riley) — Structures Department and Automotives Department
  • Structures Department Head: M.J Tomlinson

This training is limited to indentured apprentices only and at this Institute is confined to the following designated trades — Auto Body Mechanic, Carpenter, Communication Electrician, Construction Electrician, Cook, Heavy Duty Mechanic, Machinist, Motor Mechanic, Plumber, Radio and Television Mechanic, Refrigeration Mechanic, Sheet Metal Mechanic and Welder.

  • Apprenticeship in Carpentry
  • Structural Technology enrolment was 26-day students

1966/67: Day courses offered in Structural Technology as a two-year program. Structural Technology (articulated program) was a three-year program.

  • Structures Department Head: M.J Tomlinson
  • Apprenticeship: Carpenter (four years, eight weeks/year), Glassworker (four years, six weeks/year) Years one and two offered at SAIT
  • Structural Technology enrolment was 43-day students

1967/68: Day courses offered in Structural Technology as a two-year program. Structural Technology (articulated program) was a three-year program. Recreation Facility Technology as a two-year program.

Recreation Facility Technology — it was the first of its kind in Canada and possibly North America. Its purpose was to train people capable of operating facilities such as ice arenas, curling clubs, swimming pool, athletic field complexes, playground areas, golf courses, waterfront marinas and community centres.

  • Structures Department Head: M.J Tomlinson
  • Apprenticeship: Carpenter (four years, eight weeks/year), Glassworker (four years, six weeks/year) Years one and two offered at SAIT, Roofer (three years, six weeks/year) Year one offered at SAIT
  • Structural Technology enrolment was 46-day students

All Departments were assigned new, mostly three-letter, designation codes for subject and class designations.

1968/69: Day courses offered in Structural Technology as a two-year program. Structural Technology (articulated program) was a three-year program. Recreation Facility Technology as a two-year program.

  • Structures Department Head: M.J Tomlinson
  • Apprenticeship: Carpenter (four years, eight weeks/year), Glassworker (four years, six weeks/year) Years one and two offered at SAIT, Roofer (three years, six weeks/year) Year one and two offered at SAIT
  • Structural Technology enrolment was 44-day students
  • Recreational Facility Technology enrolment was 7-day students

1969/70:

  • Day course offered (diploma): Structural Technology (two years)
  • Day course offered (certificate): Recreation Facility Maintenance (three terms of eight weeks, one term of 12 weeks). Industrial terms may be taken in any desired sequence
  • Articulated course in Structural Technology was not offered

This was this last year for the articulated three-year "A, B, C" programs; with a few exceptions it had been a notable experiment that failed miserably in this execution. It was impossible for the high schools to provide the proper level and quality of training demanded by the higher levels of the Institute programs. As a result of many of these articulated students, when transferring to the Institute, failed their year and had to repeat or drop.

  • Structures Department Head: W.G Leslie
  • Apprenticeship: Carpenter (four years, eight weeks/year), Glassworker (four years, six weeks/year), Roofer (three years, six weeks/year)
  • Total academic staff was 352. In addition, there were 204 evening class instructors, some 67 off campus. There were 15 academic staff in the Structures Department
  • Structural Technology enrolment was 50-day students

On April 6, 1970, F.C Jorgenson announces that new quarter system will be introduced.

1970/71: 

  • Day course offered (diploma): Structural Technology (two years)
  • Day course offered (certificate): Recreation Facility Maintenance (three terms of eight weeks, one term of twelve weeks). Industrial terms may be taken in any desired sequence
  • Apprenticeship: Carpenter (four years, eight weeks/year), Glassworker (four years, six weeks/year)
  • Structures Department Head: W.G Leslie
  • Structural Technology enrolment was 63-day students
  • Recreation Facility Maintenance enrolment was 21-day students

This was the first year that the Institute began to operate with four 12 week quarters in the academic year. Three registration times were made available:

  • September 28, was the normal registration day for all programs
  • A second first-year intake on April 5, 1971, which was intended to accommodate those students who had graduated from the high school winter quarter
  • The third registration was in July for those students who wished to take the second or fourth quarters of their programs during the summer. There was little response to this double entry as most students wanted the summer off to find work which would earn the sufficient funds to continue their education.

1971/72:

  • Day course offered (diploma): Structural Engineering Technology (formerly Structural Technology) (two years)
  • Day course offered (certificate): Recreation Facility Maintenance (three terms of eight weeks, one term of 12 weeks). Industrial terms may be taken in any desired sequence
  • Apprenticeship: Carpenter (four years, eight weeks/year), Glassworker (four years, six weeks/year)
  • Structural Engineering Department Head: W.G Leslie
  • Structural Engineering Technology enrolment was 76-day students
  • Recreation Facility Maintenance enrolment was26-day students

1972/73:

  • Day course offered (diploma): Structural Engineering Technology (two years)
  • Day course offered (certificate): Recreation Facility Operations & Maintenance (three terms of eight weeks, one term of 12 weeks). Industrial terms may be taken in any desired sequence
  • Apprenticeship: Carpenter (four years, eight weeks/year), Glassworker (four years, six weeks/year)
  • Structural Engineering Department Head: W.G Leslie
  • Structural Engineering Technology enrolment was 80 day students

1973/74:

  • Day course offered (diploma): Structural Engineering Technology (two years)
  • Structural Engineering Technology options for the second year — Construction Management or Municipal
  • Day course offered (certificate): Recreation Facility Operations & Maintenance (three terms of eight weeks, one term of 12 weeks). Industrial terms may be taken in any desired sequence
  • Apprenticeship: Carpenter (four years, eight weeks/year), Glassworker (four years, six weeks/year)
  • Structural Engineering Department Head: W.G Leslie
  • Structural Engineering Technology enrolment was 87 day students
  • Recreation Facility Operations & Maintenance enrolment was 54 day students

1974/75:

  • Day course offered (diploma): Structural Engineering Technology (two years)
  • Day course offered (certificate): Recreation Facility Operations & Maintenance (three terms of eight weeks, one term of 12 weeks). Industrial terms may be taken in any desired sequence
  • Apprenticeship: Bricklayer (four years, six weeks/year, eight weeks/years one, two and three), Carpenter (four years, eight weeks/year), Glassworker (four years, six weeks/year), Painter & Decorator (four years, six weeks/year)
  • Structural Engineering Department Head: W.G Leslie
  • Structural Engineering Technology enrolment was 101 day students
  • Recreation Facility Operations & Maintenance enrolment was 43 day students

1975/76:

  • Day course offered (diploma): Structural Engineering Technology (two years)
  • Day course offered (certificate): Recreation Facility Operations & Maintenance (three terms of eight weeks, one term of 12 weeks). Industrial terms may be taken in any desired sequence
  • Apprenticeship: Bricklayer (four years, six weeks/year, eight weeks/years one, two and three), Carpenter (four years, eight weeks/year), Glassworker (four years, six weeks/year), Painter & Decorator (four years, six weeks/year)
  • Structural Engineering Technology enrolment was 120 day students
  • Recreation Facility Operations & Maintenance enrolment was 38 day students
  • Structures Department Head: W.G Leslie
  • SAIT now had 16 departments with 478 instructors which offered 87 different programs. Structures Department had 21 instructors.

1976/77:

  • Day course offered (diploma): Structural Engineering Technology (two years)
  • Day course offered (certificate): Recreation Facility Operations & Maintenance (three terms of eight weeks, one term of 12 weeks). Industrial terms may be taken in any desired sequence
  • Apprenticeship: Bricklayer (four years, six weeks/year, eight weeks/years one, two and three), Carpenter (four years, eight weeks/year), Glassworker (four years, six weeks/year), Painter & Decorator (four years, six weeks/year)
  • Structures Department Head: W.G Leslie
  • Structural Engineering Technology enrolment was 125 day students
  • Recreation Facility Operations & Maintenance enrolment was 32 day students
  • Carpentry apprentices was 679 students
  • Bricklayer apprentices was 90 students
  • Glassworker apprentices was 63 students
  • Painter & Decorator apprentices was 40 students
  • Total instructional staff now 481

1977/78:

  • Day course offered (diploma): Structural Engineering Technology (two years)
  • Day course offered (certificate): Recreation Facility Operations & Maintenance (three terms of eight weeks, one term of 12 weeks). Industrial terms may be taken in any desired sequence
  • Apprenticeship: Bricklayer (four years, six weeks/year, eight weeks/years one, two and three), Carpenter (four years, eight weeks/year), Glassworker (four years, six weeks/year), Painter & Decorator (four years, six weeks/year)
  • Structures Department Head: M.E Larson

1978/80:

  • Day course offered (diploma): Civil Engineering Technology (two years)
  • Day course offered (certificate): Recreation Facility Operations & Maintenance (three terms of eight weeks, one term of 12 weeks). Industrial terms may be taken in any desired sequence but the sequence shown in the Calendar is recommended. Subjects may be interchanged from term to term to facilitate staff allocation and the use of the facilities.
  • Apprenticeship: Bricklayer (four years, 12 weeks/year, six weeks/years one and two), Carpenter (four years, eight weeks/year), Glassworker (four years, six weeks/year), Painter & Decorator (three years, eight weeks/year)
  • Structures Department Head: M.E Larson

1980/81 to 1981/82:

  • Day course offered (diploma): Civil Engineering Technology (two years)
  • Day course offered (certificate): Recreation Facility Operations & Maintenance (three terms of eight weeks, one term of 12 weeks). Industrial terms may be taken in any desired sequence but the sequence shown in the Calendar is recommended. Subjects may be interchanged from term to term to facilitate staff allocation and the use of the facilities.
  • Apprenticeship: Bricklayer (four years, 12 weeks/year, six weeks/years one and two), Carpenter (four years, eight weeks/year), Glassworker (four years, six weeks/year), Painter & Decorator (three years, eight weeks/year)
  • Structures Department Head: M.E Larson

1984/85 to 1987/88:

  • Day course offered (diploma): Civil Engineering Technology (two years)
  • Day course offered (certificate): Recreation Facility Operations & Maintenance (three terms of eight weeks, one term of 12 weeks). Industrial terms may be taken in any desired sequence but the sequence shown in the calendar is recommended. Subjects may be interchanged from term to term to facilitate staff allocation and the use of the facilities.
  • Apprenticeship: Bricklayer (three years, 12 weeks/year, six weeks/years one and two), Cabinetmaker (four years, eight weeks/year), Carpenter (four years, eight weeks/year), Glassworker (four years, six weeks/year), Painter & Decorator (three years, eight weeks/year)
  • Structures Department Head: M.E Larson

1988/89:

  • Day course offered (diploma): Civil Engineering Technology (two years)
  • Recreation Facility Maintenance (formerly Recreation Facility Operations & Maintenance) program moved to a new Physical and Leisure Education Department
  • Apprenticeship: Bricklayer (three years, 12 weeks/year, six weeks/years one and two), Cabinetmaker (four years, eight weeks/year), Carpenter (four years, eight weeks/year), Glassworker (four years, six weeks/year), Painter & Decorator (three years, eight weeks/year)
  • Structures Department Head: M.E Larson

1989 to 1990 and 1991/92:

  • Day course offered (diploma): Civil Engineering Technology (two years)
  • Apprenticeship: Bricklayer (three years, 12 weeks/year, six weeks/years one and two), Cabinetmaker (four years, eight weeks/year), Carpenter (four years, eight weeks/year), Glassworker (four years, six weeks/year), Painter & Decorator (three years, eight weeks/year)
  • Structures Department Head: M.E Larson

1992/93 to 1995/96:

  • Day course offered (diploma): Civil Engineering Technology (two years)
  • Apprenticeship: Bricklayer (three years, 12 weeks/year, six weeks/years one and two), Cabinetmaker (four years, eight weeks/year), Carpenter (four years, eight weeks/year), Concrete Finisher (three years, four weeks/years one and two, no weeks for year three - only years one and two offered at SAIT) Glassworker (four years, six weeks/year), Painter & Decorator (three years, eight weeks/year)
  • Architectural & Civil Engineering Technologies Department Head: W.M Sharp

1996/97:

  • Day course offered (diploma): Civil Engineering Technology (two years)
  • Apprenticeship: Bricklayer (three years, 12 weeks/year, six weeks/years one and two), Cabinetmaker (four years, eight weeks/year), Carpenter (four years, eight weeks/year), Concrete Finisher (three years, four weeks/years one and two, no weeks for year three - only years one and two offered at SAIT) Glassworker (four years, six weeks/year), Painter & Decorator (three years, eight weeks/year)
  • Architectural & Civil Engineering Technologies Department Head: W.M Sharp

1997/98:

  • Day course offered (diploma): Civil Engineering Technology (two years), New — Wood Processing Engineering Technology (two years)

Wood Processing Engineering Technology — this new program provides the wood processing engineering industry with a "job-ready" technologist who is well versed in the design, maintenance, management and application of automated machinery for producing wood products and manufactured goods made of wood and other related products. At the time the calendar is printed, the curriculum is still under development with key representatives of all sectors of the wood processing industry involved in designing the curriculum to their specific needs. Students share a common first year of studies which is the basis for the majority of engineering technology programs at SAIT. In the second year, students select one of the optional areas of specialty of their choice.

  • Apprenticeship: Bricklayer (three years, 12 weeks/year one, six weeks/years two and three, eight weeks/years one, two and three), Cabinetmaker (four years, eight weeks/year), Carpenter (four years, eight weeks/year), Concrete Finisher (three years, four weeks/years one and two, no weeks for year three - only years one and two offered at SAIT) Glassworker (four years, six weeks/year), Painter & Decorator (three years, eight weeks/year)
  • Architectural & Civil Engineering Technologies Department Head: W.M Sharp

1998/99:

  • Day course offered (diploma): Civil Engineering Technology (two years), Wood Engineering Technology (two years)

Wood Processing Engineering Technology — A cooperative work experience of 12 weeks in the industry is an integral part of this program. There are two distinct sectors in this industry:

  • Sawmill operations plus manufactured wood products
  • Manufacture of furniture and fixtures and the manufactured homes and components industry
  • Pulp and paper is another optionwhich may be pursued with specialized training developed through other institutions in the second year
  • Apprenticeship: Bricklayer (three years, eight weeks/year), Cabinetmaker (four years, eight weeks/year), Carpenter (four years, eight weeks/year), Glassworker (four years, six weeks/year), Painter & Decorator (three years, eight weeks/year)
  • Architectural & Civil Engineering Technologies Department Head: W.M Sharp

1999/00:

  • Day course offered (diploma): Civil Engineering Technology (two years), Wood Engineering Technology (two years)
  • Apprenticeship: Bricklayer (three years, eight weeks/year), Cabinetmaker (four years, eight weeks/year), Carpenter (four years, eight weeks/year), Glassworker (four years, six weeks/year), Painter & Decorator (three years, eight weeks/year)
  • Architectural & Civil Engineering Technologies Department Head: P.E Delorme

2000/01:

  • Day course offered (diploma): Civil Engineering Technology (two years), Wood Engineering Technology (two years)
  • Apprenticeship: Bricklayer (three years, eight weeks/year), Cabinetmaker (four years, eight weeks/year), Carpenter (four years, eight weeks/year), Concrete Finisher (two years, four weeks/year), Glassworker (four years, six weeks/year), Painter & Decorator (three years, eight weeks/year)
  • Construction Dean: L.S Rosia

2001/02:

  • Day course offered (diploma): Civil Engineering Technology (two years), Wood Engineering Technology (two years)
  • Apprenticeship: Bricklayer (three years, eight weeks/year), Cabinetmaker (four years, eight weeks/year), Carpenter (four years, eight weeks/year), Concrete Finisher (two years, four weeks/year), Glassworker Glazier (four years, six weeks/year), Painter & Decorator (three years, eight weeks/year)
  • Construction Dean: L.S Rosia

2002/03:

  • Day course offered (diploma): Civil Engineering Technology (two years)
  • Apprenticeship: Bricklayer (three years, eight weeks/year), Cabinetmaker (four years, eight weeks/year), Carpenter (four years, eight weeks/year), Concrete Finisher (two years, four weeks/year), Glazier (four years, six weeks/year), Painter & Decorator (three years, eight weeks/year), Tile Setter (three years, six weeks/year)
  • Construction Dean: L.S Rosia

Pre-employment Program — Cabinetmaker Pre-Employment (12 week fast track)

  • Covers an expanded version of the first year apprenticeship training. Upon successful completion, students may challenge both the theory and practical Alberta Apprenticeship examinations. This program is designed to assist students wishing to enter the cabinetmaker industry.

Pre-employment Program — Carpenter Pre-Employment (12 week fast track)

  • Designed to help you prepare for a career as a carpenter without needing that free job. The curriculum is an expanded version of the first year apprenticeship training. Upon successful completion, students may challenge both the theory and practical Alberta Apprenticeship examinations.

Pre-employment Program — Glazier Pre-Employment (12 week fast track)

  • Covers an expanded version of the first year apprenticeship program. Students will receive extensive hands on and theoretical training related to the glazier industry. Upon successful completion, students may challenge both the theory and practical Alberta Apprenticeship examinations.

Pre-employment Program - Painting and Decorating Pre-Employment (12 week fast track)

  • Covers an expanded version of the first year apprenticeship program. Students will receive extensive hands on and theoretical training related to painting and decorating. Upon successful completion, students may challenge both the theory and practical Alberta Apprenticeship examinations.

2003/04 to 2005/06:

  • Day course offered (diploma): Civil Engineering Technology (two years)
  • Apprenticeship: Bricklayer (three years, eight weeks/year), Cabinetmaker (four years, eight weeks/year), Carpenter (four years, eight weeks/year), Concrete Finisher (two years, four weeks/year), Glazier (four years, six weeks/year), Painter & Decorator (three years, eight weeks/year), Tile Setter (three years, six weeks/year)
  • Pre-employment Training Programs: Cabinetmaker pre-employment, Carpentry pre-employment, Glazier pre-employment, Painting and Decorating pre-employment
  • Construction Dean: L.S Rosia

2006/07:

  • Day course offered (diploma): Civil Engineering Technology (two years)
  • Apprenticeship: Bricklayer (three years, eight weeks/year), Cabinetmaker (four years, eight weeks/year), Carpenter (four years, eight weeks/year), Concrete Finisher (two years, four weeks/year), Glazier (four years, six weeks/year), Painter & Decorator (three years, eight weeks/year), Tile Setter (two years, eight weeks/year)
  • Pre-employment Training Programs: Cabinetmaker pre-employment, Carpentry pre-employment, Glazier pre-employment
  • Construction Dean: L.S Rosia

2007/08 to 2008/09:

  • Day course offered (diploma): Civil Engineering Technology (two years)
  • Apprenticeship: Bricklayer (three years, eight weeks/year), Cabinetmaker (four years, eight weeks/year), Carpenter (four years, eight weeks/year), Concrete Finisher (two years, four weeks/year), Glazier (four years, six weeks/year), Painter & Decorator (three years, eight weeks/year), Tile Setter (three years, eight weeks/year)
  • Pre-employment Training Programs: Cabinetmaker pre-employment, Carpenter pre-employment, Glazier pre-employment, Painting and Decorating pre-employment
  • Construction Dean: L.S Rosia

2008/09:

  • Day course offered (diploma): Civil Engineering Technology (two years)
  • Apprenticeship: Bricklayer (three years, eight weeks/year), Cabinetmaker (four years, eight weeks/year), Carpenter (four years, eight weeks/year), Concrete Finisher (two years, four weeks/year), Glazier (four years, six weeks/year), Painter & Decorator (three years, eight weeks/year), Tile Setter (three years, eight weeks/year)
  • Pre-employment Training Programs: Cabinetmaker pre-employment, Carpenter pre-employment, Glazier pre-employment, Painting and Decorating pre-employment
  • School of Construction: L.S Rosia

2009/10:

  • Day course offered (diploma): Civil Engineering Technology (two years)
  • Apprenticeship: Bricklayer (three years, eight weeks/year), Cabinetmaker (four years, eight weeks/year), Carpenter (four years, eight weeks/year), Concrete Finisher (two years, four weeks/year), Glazier (four years, six weeks/year), Painter & Decorator (three years, eight weeks/year), Tile Setter (three years, eight weeks/year)
  • Pre-employment Training Programs: Cabinetmaker pre-employment, Carpenter pre-employment, Glazier pre-employment, Painting and Decorating pre-employment
  • School of Construction

2010/11 to 2011/12:

  • Day course offered (diploma): Civil Engineering Technology (two years)
  • Apprenticeship: Bricklayer (three years, eight weeks/year), Cabinetmaker (four years, eight weeks/year), Carpenter (four years, eight weeks/year), Concrete Finisher (two years, four weeks/year), Glazier (four years, six weeks/year), Painter & Decorator (three years, eight weeks/year)
  • Pre-employment Training Programs: Cabinetmaker pre-employment, Carpenter pre-employment
  • School of Construction

2012/13:

  • Day course offered (diploma): Civil Engineering Technology (two years) — this program is under review and could undergo changes
  • Apprenticeship: Bricklayer (three years, eight weeks/year), Cabinetmaker (four years, eight weeks/year), Carpenter (four years, eight weeks/year), Concrete Finisher (three years, four weeks/year one and two, no weeks/year three), Glazier (four years, six weeks/year), Painter & Decorator (three years, eight weeks/year)
  • Pre-employment Training Programs: Cabinetmaker pre-employment, Carpenter pre-employment
  • School of Construction

2013/14:

  • Day course offered (diploma): Civil Engineering Technology (two years)
  • Apprenticeship: Bricklayer (three years, eight weeks/year), Cabinetmaker (four years, eight weeks/year), Carpenter (four years, eight weeks/year), Concrete Finisher (three years, four weeks/year one and two, no weeks/year three), Glazier (four years, six weeks/year), Painter & Decorator (three years, eight weeks/year)
  • Pre-employment Training Programs: Cabinetmaker pre-employment, Carpenter pre-employment
  • School of Construction
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