Overview

The Mechanical Engineering Technology program is a practical, hands-on, full-time, two-year diploma program that lets you develop strong technical, analytical, and problem-solving skills essential for a range of exciting careers in the challenging field of mechanical engineering.

The first two semesters are common to all students in the program, with various topics, including foundational math and physics, Computer-Aided Design (CAD) and additional specialized courses to prepare you to enter your second-year major. You'll also focus on developing your skills in professionalism, creativity, teamwork, effective communication and collaboration. 

In Design and Development, you'll further build skills in product design and development, prototyping, ergonomics and industrial design.

While we strive to put you in the major of your choice, grades for specific courses will be used in the selection criteria for each major in the event of a seat shortage for specific majors.

The opportunity to advance your education by transferring into this program or gain credit for previous postsecondary courses may be available.

There may also be opportunities to further your education by transferring to another institution once you graduate.

Learn more about program and institution transfer options.

You'll participate in a capstone project addressing a real-world industry challenge.

This program is nationally accredited by the Technology Accreditation Canada (TAC).

Graduates may apply for their Certified Engineering Technologist (CET) designation after two years of appropriate work experience.

While attending SAIT, you can become members of the following societies:

  • Association of Science and Engineering Technology Professionals (ASET)
  • Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE)
  • American Society for Quality (ASQ)

After successfully completing this program, graduates will receive a SAIT diploma in Mechanical Engineering Technology — Design and Development.

Download program info

Careers and opportunities

Each year, SAIT conducts a survey between February and April to determine the employment rate, salary and satisfaction of our newest SAIT alumni. 

people icon 93% graduate employment rate

salary icon $55,000 average starting salary

Find out more about our graduate employment statistics >

Our graduates may work in the following occupations. Some careers require additional experience and education.

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Career counselling and support

Unsure which career path is for you? SAIT offers career planning services to help you decide your future.

You can also get started by taking our online career finder quiz, which can help you narrow down your search based on your current skills and interests.

Finally, you can also head to Alberta alis for various tools and resources, including additional quizzes and labour market information to help you narrow down a career path.

Services and workshops

Courses

The Mechanical Engineering Technology - Design and Development diploma requires 60 credits (24 courses) to complete.

If you wish to study full-time during the day, the program spans two years, with two semesters each year.

If you choose to study evenings and weekends, the program spans three years.

View classes by semester

Mechanical engineering technology core

Course Credits

This applied computer course provides students with critical electronic communications, data and file management skills, along with a strong focus on using common productivity applications to format, calculate, analyze, visualize, and present or report data and information. Industry standard project management principles are implemented throughout the course from a digital perspective, so students can have an appreciation for how computing skills relate to real world business processes.

3

In this course, you will explore the kinematics of objects in translation and rotation. Velocities of objects in plane motion using both the relative velocity equation method and the instantaneous centre of rotation method will also be covered. In addition, kinetics of objects in translation, rotation, and plane motion using both Newton’s second law and conservation of energy methods will be explained.

1.5

This course examines the classification, structure, properties, application and selection of common materials used in engineering applications. Material examples from each of the most common categories (ferrous alloys, non-ferrous alloys, polymers, ceramics and composites) will be examined. Other topics include casting and working of metals, heat treatment, effect of microstructure on properties, corrosion and failure analysis. Cross-referenced to the National Technology Benchmarks (NTB).

Equivalents:
  • EMTL 232
3

By using industry standard 3-D modeling software the learner will create, analyze and communicate their designs. The models created will be analyzed for mechanical strength and optimization as well as for the sustainability of the materials chosen. The learner will generate 2-D drawings that comply with industry standards and norms to communicate their ideas. Cross-referenced to the National Technology Benchmarks (NTB).

Pre-requisites:
  • MECH 200
3

This course enables the student to apply the basic knowledge of algebra and introductory calculus to resolve applied scientific and technological problems. Applications include linear motion, areas under curves, and volumes of revolution.

Equivalents:
  • MATH 235
  • MATH 1011
3

This course enables the student to apply advanced algebra, integral and differential calculus methodologies to scientific and technological applications. Topics include trigonometric and transcendental calculus, methods of integration, specifically integration by parts, by trigonometric substitution, and by use of tables. Applications include linear motion, areas under curves, volumes of revolution, centroids, moments of inertia, and program-relevant applications.

Pre-requisites:
  • MATH 238
Equivalents:
  • MATH 285
3

This design course introduces the basic building blocks required for the common core and the three specializations. Using wide-ranging, flexible design reasoning the learner will learn how to set up problems based on a good understanding of the underlying principles, choose a plan to solve them, and present the results. Cross-referenced to the National Technology Benchmarks (NTB).

Equivalents:
  • DSGN 216
3

This course examines the complex inter-relationship between technology and society. More specifically, this course frames the designation of Mechanical Engineering Technologist in relation to pre-industrial and post-industrial societies in the contemporary building environment. Beginning with historical roots, this course will explain the technologist’s role in developing technologies through exploration of career options, case studies and real world examples, such as field trips and current events.

1.5

Electro-mechanical Systems is an introductory course to the world of automation for manufacturing. The course includes theory and lab activities involving pneumatic, electrical, electro-pneumatic, robotics, and computer control applications. The course design is for the beginner who is new to the various control systems and will benefit all Mechanical Engineering Technologists in the workplace as many companies adopt automation for sustainable growth of evolving and competitive manufacturing industries. Cross-referenced to the National Technology Benchmarks (NTB).

3

The purpose of this course is to examine the different manufacturing systems and manufacturing processes used in industry. The course also includes measurement and inspection as well as surface treatment and finishing processes. Cross-referenced to the National Technology Benchmarks (NTB).

3

This course covers components and resultants of vectors, two-force members, free-body diagrams, equations of equilibrium, equilibrium of concurrent force systems and pulley systems, moments and couples, equilibrium of non concurrent force systems, truss analysis using method of joints and method of sections, and frame analysis using method of members.

Equivalents:
  • STCS 200
  • STCS 242
1.5

The study of energy in its many forms involves thermodynamic principles. Basic concepts of work, heat, flow and non-flow systems, and equations of state, perfect gases and properties of pure substances. The first law of thermodynamics is applied to practical systems like compressors, turbines, nozzles and other practical system to implement the concept of energy conversion. Basic power cycles will be analyzed and the performance merit to be determined. The various modes of heat transfer will be practiced and applied to simple situations. Cross-referenced to the National Technology Benchmarks (NTB).

1.5

Design and development core

Course Credits

Professional Communication and Presentation Skills will introduce learners to the professional writing, collaboration and presentation skills needed to be successful in their chosen field.  Learners will gain an understanding of the strategies and competencies required for effective communication with an emphasis on developing the interpersonal skills needed to perform as part of a high-functioning team.  Coursework will require learners to work in individual and collaborative settings.

Equivalents:
  • COMM 265
3

Machine design analysis will be practiced for members under static and fatigue loading based on the relevant theory of failure and design criteria. Students will study the rules involved in traditional machine design details. Cross-referenced to the National Technology Benchmarks (NTB).

Pre-requisites:
  • EMTL 300
  • ENGD 250
3

An introduction to economic problem solving and decision-making in industry. The learner will be able to perform feasibility studies for projects considering time value of money utilizing the fundamental concepts of engineering economics. Cross-referenced to the National Technology Benchmarks (NTB).

1.5

Members subjected to various loading conditions (axial, shear, torsion, transverse and combined) will be designed to perform safely, based on regulating bodies and industry practices. Stress concentration factors at geometry discontinuities will be applied and strength and deformation criteria of design will be used. Structural components will be analyzed for combined stress states including stress and strain transformation. Basic design of pressure vessels and the basic requirements of ASME code will be addressed. Critical loads in columns will be determined. Introduction to experimental stress analysis and to FEA for stress analysis and computer simulation will be addressed. Cross-referenced to the National Technology Benchmarks (NTB).

Pre-requisites:
  • EMTL 250
  • MATH 288
  • STCS 255
Equivalents:
  • SMTL 300
3

FLDS 320 is an introductory course into the design and function of hydraulic and pneumatic components and systems. The learning activities include theory, design and practical laboratory exercises for fluid power systems and circuits used in industry. Cross-referenced to the National Technology Benchmarks (NTB).

Pre-requisites:
  • MECH 205
Equivalents:
  • FLDS 385
1.5

The purpose of this course is to examine the fundamentals of design for manufacturability and assembly, introduction to lean manufacturing, introduction to geometric dimensioning and tolerancing, and introduction to quality. Cross-referenced to the National Technology Benchmarks (NTB).

Pre-requisites:
  • ENGD 250
  • MNFG 290
3

Product Development introduces the learner to the product development process. The learner will exercise concepts of technical and social functionality, including: functional constraints, end user data and manufacturability. The learner will apply the design process with practical applications through innovative hands-on projects. Projects will help the learner build proficiency in design methodologies including: problem definition, concept generation, ergonomics, applying design and material constraints. An emphasis will be placed on visual and written communication. Cross-referenced to the National Technology Benchmarks (NTB).

Pre-requisites:
  • ENGD 250
3

In the Model Making and Prototyping course the learner practices the hand skills needed to provide the differing models and prototypes required at the various development stages of product development. The learner will apply basic shop techniques and principles to create physical models and prototypes.

Pre-requisites:
  • MNFG 290
Corequsites:
  • PRDT 310
Equivalents:
  • PRDT 350
1.5

In Applied Product Development, the learner will develop skills in product development, apply ergonomic principles and test physical models or prototypes. The learner will also judge potential designs and concepts against pre-determined criteria. Cross-referenced to the National Technology Benchmarks (NTB).

Pre-requisites:
  • MNFG 290
Corequsites:
  • PRDT 305
Equivalents:
  • PRDT 350
1.5

Digital simulation allows the learner to simulate products during the design effort, before physical prototypes, which saves time and cost. Apart from helping to optimize designs, the learner will explore how simulations can streamline data and documentation generation. The learner will also use simulations as redesign departures and for rich product visualizations. Cross-referenced to the National Technology Benchmarks (NTB).

Pre-requisites:
  • EMTL 300
  • PRDT 300
3

Conceptual and embodiment design are the two essential parts of any real world mechanical design project. In this capstone, the learner will build on their program to-date to cement their ability to generate thorough design solutions through logical, systematic thinking when confronted with difficult, vague problems. Team-based skills sets are emphasized. Cross-referenced to the National Technology Benchmarks (NTB).

Pre-requisites:
  • COMM 256
  • COMP 213
  • ENGD 250
3

STAT 245 is an introductory course in data analysis for students in engineering technology programs. Students apply techniques to organize, display, analyze and report data. Outcomes include methods of descriptive and inferential statistics. Students will be exposed to software-based methods in laboratory sessions using industry-grade data. Some advanced topics of analysis are selectable toward the end of the course.

3

Progression

Students must attain a PGPA and/or a CGPA of 2.0 or better in each semester and pass the necessary prerequisite courses to progress through the program. To qualify for graduation, students must pass all courses, attain a CGPA of 2.0 or better and complete course requirements within the prescribed timelines.

Review our grading and progression procedure >

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Explore your options!

Some courses in this program are available through Open Studies. You can complete courses via Open Studies to get a head start on your education, reduce your course load once accepted into a credentialed program, or determine which career path best suits you before you fully commit. 

You may also take courses for general interest or personal and professional development.

Available Open Studies courses

Admission requirements

Applicants educated in Canada

All applicants must demonstrate English language proficiency and meet the following requirements or equivalents.

  • at least 60% in Math 30-1 or 75% in Math 30-2
  • at least 60% in English Language Arts 30-1 or English Language Arts 30-2
  • at least 60% in Physics 20 and Chemistry 20 or 60% in Science 30.

SAIT accepts high school course equivalents for admission for applicants educated outside Alberta.

All applicants who were educated outside of Canada must demonstrate English Language proficiency and provide proof they meet the program admission requirements with an international document assessment. Find out what educational documents are accepted and assessment options.

SAIT may also accept courses completed at certain international post-secondary institutions.

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Academic Upgrading

Missing an admission requirement for this program? Upgrade your prior education to help you receive admission into one of SAIT's career programs.

Upgrade
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English language proficiency

All applicants must demonstrate English language proficiency prior to admission, including students educated in Canada.

Learn more

Available intakes

Fall 2024

Start dates:

Domestic students: Open
  • Application deadline: June 28, 2024
International students: Closed
  • Application deadline: May 29, 2024

Costs

2023/24 tuition and fees

The following costs are effective as of July 1, 2023. They are an estimate of tuition and fees based on the recommended course load per year.

Domestic students

Year Number of semesters Tuition fees Additional fees Total per year
1 2 $6,270 $1,570 $7,840
2 2 $6,270 $1,570 $7,840
Total cost:
$15,680

Year Number of semesters Tuition fees Additional fees Total per year
1 2 $18,558.60 $1,570 $20,128.60
2 2 $18,558.60 $1,570 $20,128.60
Total cost:
$40,257.20

Books and supplies are approximately $1,500 per full-time year.

Find your booklist on the SAIT Bookstore's website. The booklist will be available closer to the program start date. Can’t find your program or course? The bookstore didn't receive a textbook list. Contact your program directly to determine if they’re still refining course details or if you're in luck; no textbook purchase is required this term.

This is a bring-your-own-device program with a custom computer hardware and software requirement. 

The preferred hardware requirements for this program are as follows:

  • Intel i7 (gen 7 or newer or AMD Ryzen 7)
  • 16 GB RAM or greater
  • 1 TB HD or greater
  • Nvidia Quadro or AMD Radeon Pro video card
  • Windows 10 PC (build 1906 or higher)

There is also required software, including SolidWorks.

During the program, you will use industry-standard software. Although the minimum specification will work, we recommend the best computer you can afford.

Required equipment/tools

The required tools will be provided.

Required personal protective equipment (PPE)

Safety glasses are required on the first day of class.

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Financial aid

Paying for your education may feel overwhelming, but we have resources and programs that can help, including information about payment options, student loans, grants and scholarships.

Learn more

Application process

When applying in the application portal, select Mechanical Engineering Technology. You will declare your major before your second year of the program.

Ready to apply?

Follow our step-by-step guide to submitting a successful application.

Learn how to apply

Communication during admission

Email is the primary source of communication during the selection process. Ensure your personal email account is managed appropriately to receive our emails, files and communications. We recommend you add the ma.info@sait.ca domain to your safe senders' list or you risk missing critical email messages.

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Begin your application

Apply now using the online application portal. 

Ensure you have a valid Visa or Mastercard to pay the non-refundable application fee of $120 for domestic applicants or $150 for international applicants. 

Apply now

Information sessions

Prepare for a strong start in your chosen program or get the details you need to decide your future path.

Our expert staff and faculty are ready to answer your questions and provide information about the following:

  • What sets SAIT apart
  • An introduction to the program and area of study
  • Admission requirements
  • Future career paths
  • Information on the earning potential and graduate employment rates.

Contact us

School of Manufacturing and Automation Advising

Phone
403.284.8641
Email
ma.info@sait.ca

International Student Advising

Phone
403.284.8852
Email
international@sait.ca