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Accessibility Services

Whether you're in a classroom or learning online, take advantage of the resources and support offered by the Lamb Learner Success Centre (MC 221 Stan Grad)

Accessibility Services reduces barriers to learning at SAIT through:

  • assistance with funding applications for services, equipment and technology
  • equipment loans
  • classroom and exam accommodations
  • consultations and referrals

Achieve your academic best through a more accessible learning experience — we support students with documented mobility, sensory (vision, hearing), learning, attentional, neurological, psychological or temporary disabilities.

If you think you may have a condition affecting your learning but have not been formally diagnosed, we may be able to arrange an assessment — contact us

If you're looking for accommodation for religious observance, contact the Interfaith Centre.

Last year, more than 1,500 students registered with Accessibility Services.

Are you considering applying at SAIT?

Start planning for post-secondary — explore the Government of Alberta's Transition Planning Guide: A Career and Education Planning Guide for Students with Disabilities.

Accessibility Services also hosts info sessions for prospective students to learn more about

  • reasonable accommodations
  • documentation requirements and funding
  • understanding the role of students, instructors, parents and advisors in a post-secondary setting.

Contact us for more information. 

What documentation is required?

To qualify for accommodations, students are required to provide supporting medical or other documentation (physician’s statements, functional assessment forms, psychoeducational assessments, etc.). Documentation must be created by a professional with expertise in the area of the specific disability/health condition. It must describe the current impact of the disability/health condition and recommend appropriate accommodations.

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is considered a neurological disability that interferes with a person's ability to sustain attention, focus on a task or control impulsive behaviour. Many people have difficulty sitting still, paying attention or controlling impulses. Yet, for some people, the problem is so chronic and persistent that it gets in the way of daily life, at home, at school, at work and in social settings.

Documentation requirements
Physicians, psychologists or psychiatrists are the professionals qualified to diagnose ADHD. A letter from a physician or psychiatrist is sufficient; a psychologist prefers a psycho-educational assessment. The psycho-educational evaluation should be conducted no earlier than three years before the student's initial request for disability-related services at SAIT.

The diagnostic report must be dated and submitted on letterhead and include:

  • clinician's name, title, phone number and address
  • date(s) of examination
  • summary of all instruments and procedures used in the assessment
  • a written summary of educational, medical, family histories and behavioural observations
  • test scores (e.g. percentiles) and a detailed interpretation of the results including strengths and weaknesses
  • suggestions for specific academic adjustments and accommodations which may assist in minimizing the impact of functional limitations on the student's academic performance
  • signed original preferred.

Autism spectrum disorders are pervasive developmental neurological disorders ranging from a severe form, called autistic disorder, to a milder form, Asperger syndrome.

If a person has symptoms of either of these disorders but does not meet the specific criteria for either, the diagnosis is called pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS).

Documentation requirements
Physicians, psychologists or psychiatrists are the professionals qualified to diagnose Autism. A letter from a physician or psychiatrist is sufficient; a psychologist prefers a psycho-educational assessment. The psycho-educational evaluation should be conducted no earlier than three years before the student's initial request for disability-related services at SAIT.

The diagnostic report must be dated and submitted on letterhead and include:

  • clinician's name, title, phone number and address
  • date(s) of examination
  • summary of all instruments and procedures used in the assessment
  • a written summary of educational, medical, family histories and behavioural observations
  • test scores (e.g. percentiles) and a detailed interpretation of the results including strengths and weaknesses
  • suggestions for specific academic adjustments and accommodations which may assist in minimizing the impact of functional limitations on the student's academic performance
  • signed original preferred.

Chronic health disabilities include medical conditions that significantly limit a student's ability to function in an educational environment.

Chronic health conditions may include but are not limited to cystic fibrosis, HIV, cancer, hepatitis, kidney disease, severe allergies, asthma, fibromyalgia and chemical sensitivities.

Documentation requirements
Family physicians or medical specialists are professionals qualified to diagnose chronic health conditions. A diagnosis of a medical condition alone is not sufficient to be eligible for accommodations and supports. Documentation must indicate the impact of the condition on the student in an academic setting. It is recommended that assessments and evaluations be conducted no earlier than three years before the student's initial request for disability-related services at SAIT.

Documentation must include:

  • clinician's name, title, phone number and address
  • date(s) of examination
  • a clear statement of the chronic illness or disorder, a summary of present symptoms, and a statement of the treatment, if applicable
  • where relevant, a description of the severity, longevity, or expected progression or stability of the illness or disorder
  • Medical information relating to the student's needs, including the impact of medication on the student's ability to meet the demands of the post-secondary environment
  • description of how the chronic illness or disorder and treatment, if applicable, impact the student's functioning in an academic setting
  • suggestions on specific types of accommodations which may minimize academic barriers
  • signed original preferred.

Deaf students have severe to profound hearing loss and typically use sign language as their primary mode of communication. Some deaf individuals rely on oral communication; some may have residual hearing and may use a hearing aid to augment the communication process, monitor their voice or hear environmental sounds.

Hard of hearing students may have mild to severe hearing loss and use speech as their primary mode of communication. Students with slight hearing loss may miss up to 50% of class discussions, especially if voices are soft or the environment is noisy. Students may require the use of a hearing aid or personal FM system and other accommodations that match their individual needs.

Documentation requirements
An Audiologist is the professional qualified to diagnose hearing loss.

The documentation must be dated and submitted on letterhead and include:

  • clinician's name, title, phone number and address
  • date(s) of examination
  • an audiological assessment and report with a medical diagnosis of hearing loss, along with the prognosis and functional impact of the loss
  • suggestions for specific academic adjustments and accommodations which may assist in minimizing the impact of hearing loss
  • signed original preferred.

Learning disabilities refer to several conditions which may affect the acquisition, organization, retention, understanding or use of verbal or non-verbal information. The conditions affect learning in individuals who otherwise demonstrate at least average abilities for thinking or reasoning. As such, learning disabilities are distinct from global intellectual deficiency.

Documentation requirements
Registered psychologists with expertise in diagnosing learning disabilities are the professionals qualified to diagnose. Learning disabilities are diagnosed after a psycho-educational assessment that notes the individuals' achievement on individually administered standardized tests in reading, mathematics, or written expression is below the expected for age, schooling and level of intelligence.

The psycho-educational assessment should be conducted no earlier than three years before the student's initial request for disability-related services at SAIT.

The documentation must be dated and submitted on letterhead and include:

  • clinician's name, title, phone number and address
  • date(s) of examination
  • summary of all instruments and procedures used in the assessment
  • a written summary of educational, medical, family histories and behavioural observations
  • test scores (e.g. standard scores, percentiles, confidence, intervals) and a detailed interpretation of the results including strengths and weaknesses
  • description of intra-cognitive or aptitude-achievement discrepancies or the clinician's rationale for clinical judgment
  • statement of how the learning disability substantially interferes with the student's educational progress
  • suggestions for specific academic adjustments and accommodations which may assist in minimizing the impact of functional limitations and maximizing the student's academic performance
  • require a statement that describes unique academic demands of SAIT
  • signed original preferred.

Mental health (psychiatric) disabilities involve disturbances in thinking, emotion and behaviour.

Diagnoses include but are not limited to depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, panic disorder, social anxiety, generalized anxiety disorder, PTSD, specific phobias, obsessive-compulsive disorders, eating disorders and substance abuse.

Documentation requirements
Psychiatrists, physicians or psychologists are the professionals qualified to diagnose mental health disabilities (dependent on the diagnosis). A diagnosis of a mental health disorder alone is not sufficient for the eligible for accommodations and supports.

Documentation must indicate the impact of the condition on the student in an academic setting. As the nature of a mental health disorder can change within a short time, it's recommended that documentation of a mental health disorder should be dated within three months of the student's initial request for disability-related services at SAIT.

The documentation must be dated and submitted on letterhead and include:

  • clinician's name, title, phone number and address
  • date(s) of examination
  • a clear statement of the disability, including DSM-IV diagnosis and a summary of past and present symptoms
  • a summary of assessment procedures or evaluation instruments used to make the diagnosis
  • medical information relating to the student's needs, including the impact of medication on the student's ability to meet the demands of a post-secondary education environment
  • suggestions for specific academic adjustments and accommodations which may assist in minimizing the impact of functional limitations and maximizing the student's academic performance
  • signed original preferred.

Neurological disability refers to a condition or limitation impacting the central nervous system. Difficulties exhibited in one or more of the following areas:

  • the use of memory
  • the control and use of cognitive functioning
  • sensory and motor skills
  • speech
  • language
  • organizational skills
  • information processing, affect social skills or essential life functions.

Diagnoses include but are not limited to:

  • cerebral palsy
  • multiple sclerosis
  • muscular dystrophy
  • graphic praxis
  • head injury
  • stroke
  • Parkinson's disease
  • Tourette's syndrome
  • fetal alcohol syndrome/fetal alcohol effects
  • epilepsy

Documentation requirements
Neurologists, psychologists, neuropsychologists, psychiatrists or physicians are the professionals qualified to diagnose a neurological condition. A diagnosis of a neurological condition alone is not sufficient to be eligible for accommodations and supports.

Documentation must indicate the impact of the condition on the student in an academic setting. For many neurological conditions, specifically brain injuries, the documentation should refer to a comprehensive assessment that addresses the student's aptitude, achievement and information processing abilities. 

The documentation must be dated and submitted on letterhead and include: 

  • clinician's name, title, phone number and address
  • date(s) of examination
  • summary of all instruments and procedures
  • a written summary of educational, medical, family histories and behavioural observations
  • test scores (e.g. percentiles) and a detailed interpretation of the results including strengths and weaknesses
  • description of intra-cognitive or aptitude-achievement discrepancies or the clinician's rationale for clinical judgment
  • statement of how the brain injury might interfere with the student's educational progress
  • suggestions for specific academic adjustments and accommodations which may assist in minimizing the impact of functional limitations on the student's academic performance
  • signed original preferred.

Physical disabilities include several disabilities causing a loss of function in areas of independent movement, resulting from nervous system impairment, amputation or a musculoskeletal condition.

These include, but aren't limited to arthritis, repetitive strain injury, carpal tunnel syndrome, soft tissue injury, spina bifida, amputations, paraplegia, quadriplegia, obesity.

Documentation requirements
A physician or specialist focused in the area of the disability is the professional qualified to diagnose physical disabilities.

Because the provision of all academic accommodations is individualized and based upon the impact of a disability on current academic performance, it is recommended that assessments and evaluations should be conducted no earlier than three months before the student's initial request for disability-related services at SAIT.

The documentation must be dated and submitted on letterhead and include:

  • clinician's name, title, phone number and address
  • date(s) of examination
  • a clear statement of the physical disability, a summary of present symptoms and a statement of the treatment, if applicable
  • where relevant, a description of the severity, longevity or expected progression or stability of the disability
  • medical information relating to the student's needs, including the impact of medication on the student's ability to meet the demands of the post-secondary environment
  • description of how the disability and treatment, if applicable, impact the student's functioning in an academic setting
  • suggestions for specific academic adjustments and accommodations which may assist in minimizing academic barriers
  • signed original preferred.

Temporary disabilities or conditions include, but are not limited to, broken dominant hand or hospitalization due to surgery, illness or injury.

Documentation requirements
Temporary disabilities or conditions are considered to be in the medical domain and require the diagnosis by a professional with expertise in the area of the particular illness or disability.

It is recommended that assessments and evaluations should be conducted no earlier than one month before the student's initial request for disability-related services at SAIT.

The documentation must be dated and submitted on letterhead and include:

  • clinician's name, title, phone number and address
  • date(s) of examination
  • a clear statement of the temporary disability or condition, a summary of present symptoms, and a statement of the treatment, if applicable
  • where relevant, a description of the severity, longevity or expected progression or stability of the temporary disability
  • medical information relating to the student's needs, including the impact of treatment (medication, physiotherapy) on the student's ability to meet the demands of the post-secondary environment
  • description of how the temporary illness or disorder and treatment, if applicable, impact the student's functioning in an academic setting
  • suggestions for specific academic adjustments and accommodations which may assist in minimizing academic barriers
  • signed original preferred.

Visual disability is a generic term which covers a range of difficulties with vision, including a visual acuity of 6/21 (20/70) or less in the better eye after correction (best-corrected vision). A visual field of 20 degrees or less, a progressive eye disease with a prognosis of becoming one of the above in the next few years or, a visual problem or related visual stamina that is not correctable and results in the student functioning as if his or her visual acuity is limited to 6/21 (20/70) or less.

For educational purposes, a student with visual impairment is one whose visual activity is not sufficient for the student to participate with ease in everyday activities in an educational setting.

Documentation requirements
An ophthalmologist is the professional qualified to diagnose visual disabilities.

Because the provision of all academic accommodations is individualized and based upon the impact of a disability on current academic performance, it is recommended that assessments and evaluations should be conducted no earlier than three months before the student's initial request for disability-related services at SAIT.

The documentation must be dated and submitted on letterhead and include:

  • clinician's name, title, phone number and address
  • date(s) of examination
  • a clear statement of the limits of vision, a statement of the level of best-corrected vision, a summary of present symptoms, and a statement of possible treatment, if applicable
  • where relevant, a description of the severity, longevity or expected progression or stability of the vision loss
  • medical information relating to the student's needs, including the impact of medication on the student's ability to meet the demands of the post-secondary environment
  • description of how the vision loss and treatment, if applicable, impact the student's functioning in an academic setting
  • suggestions for specific academic adjustments and accommodations which may assist in minimizing academic barriers
  • signed original preferred.

Arranging accommodations for the first time

Arranging accommodations/services and obtaining proper funding takes time. Contact us well before your first day of classes; six months in advance is ideal.

Review: AC.3.16.1 Accommodations for Students with Disabilities policy and procedure.

Review the documentation requirements section above and gather your documentation. 

Initiate request for accommodations by contacting Accessibility Services prior to the start of the semester (6-8 weeks prior to the semester start is preferred)

Based on the documentation and discussion, the advisor will make recommendations in an accommodation memo.

While your accommodations may not change YOU are responsible for providing a copy of your memo to all of your instructors at the beginning of each term or training period. If you do not provide, you will NOT receive your accommodations.

Eligible students must apply for funding to offset the cost of services, equipment or technology.

Eligibility for specific accommodations and services depends on the nature of the disability/health condition, the documentation confirming the disability/health condition and the requirements of each course or program.

Exam accommodation booking request

To book an exam with accommodations to write in the Testing Centre, you must:

  • be enrolled in a SAIT program
  • be registered with Accessibility Services
  • have an up-to-date accommodation memo (valid for length of study)

Submit your booking request through Testing Services Register Blast system.

To ensure your accommodations are added to your booking, you need to sign in to your account. Further details on how to book can be found here.

Update your accommodations

Your accommodation memo is valid for the length of your student. If you need to update your accommodations at any point, please make an appointment with your Accessibility Advisor.

Confidentiality and FOIP

A student’s disability is private information protected under FOIP and Human Rights Legislation.

Do:

  • Discuss your accommodations with your instructors at the beginning of your term when you receive the memo, in order to talk about how you can best receive those accommodations
  • Reach out to the Accessibility Advisor if you have questions or concerns about unmet accommodation requests

You are not required to

  • Share your diagnosis
  • Discuss your accommodations:
    • in front of the class
    • with other students
    • with other staff/faculty not specifically involved with your accommodations

Funding resources

There are several funding options available for services and support while you're attending SAIT. An accessibility advisor or SAIT's Financial Advising team can help you get started and assist with application processes.

Funding sources include:

Accessibility Related Leave/Withdrawals

Should you need to temporarily (12 months or less) leave your program for unforeseen medical reasons, you may be permitted a student leave. Please see AC.3.16.1 Student Leaves Procedure.

To apply for a medically related leave/withdraw, students must start by having a conversation with their Academic Chair/Academic Advisor. Following that conversation. Please contact accessibility.services@sait.ca to complete the leave request. Medical documentation will be required.

To qualify for accommodations, students are required to provide supporting medical or other documentation (physician’s statements, functional assessment forms, psychoeducational assessments, etc.). Some of these documents contain recommendations for accommodations. The accessibility advisor then meets with the student to discuss the best accommodations to meet the student’s needs while meeting the academic requirements of the SAIT program.

  1. Human Rights Legislation

There are 15 grounds under which people are protected with Human Rights Legislation. They include:

  • Race
  • Religious beliefs
  • Colour
  • Gender
  • Gender identity
  • Gender expression
  • Physical disability
  • Mental disability
  • Age
  • Ancestry
  • Place of origin
  • Marital status
  • Source of income
  • Family status
  • Sexual orientation

 

We have a duty to accommodate our students with disabilities in higher education to the point of undue hardship to SAIT.

It may also include such considerations as

  Test

Bona fide occupational requirements

  1. Formal documentation to support accommodation

At SAIT, we require students to provide formal documentation in the form of one or more of the following:

  • Psycho-educational assessments completed by registered psychologists
  • Functional limitations assessments completed by medical practitioners
  • Detailed medical letters from medical practitioners

 

  1. Collaboration between the student, instructor/Academic Chair and the accessibility Advisor

As accessibility advisors, we rely on faculty and academic chairs to outline the essential requirements of courses and programs. From there, we work with students and programs to set reasonable accommodations to reduce or eliminate barriers.

The accommodation also does not need to be perfect or exactly as requested. It must be reasonable. This is where the role of the Accessibility Advisor is so important. Though active discussion between the student, the Accessibility advisor and the Academic Chair/faculty member, we can create a reasonable accommodation that can work for the student and meet the academic integrity requirements of the program. 

The accommodation also cannot influence the essential requirements or academic integrity of a course or program.

  • Initiate the request for accommodations by contacting Accessibility Services prior to the start of the semester (6-8 weeks prior to the semester start is preferred)
  • Complete intake forms and provide necessary documentation to support the request
  • Meet with the advisor to discuss appropriate accommodations
  • Provide the accommodation memo to SAIT instructors at the BEGINNING of each term/training period
  • Communicate with instructors to advocate for their academic success
  • Meet with Accessibility advisor to discuss progress, changes in or concerns with accommodations

  • Review the student intake form and documentation
  • Meet with the student to discuss needs/reasonable accommodations
  • Meet with instructor/Academic Chair as needed to discuss accommodation (usually if complex)
  • Create accommodation memo and provide to student and Academic Chair
  • Meet with student to discuss progress, changes in or concerns with accommodations
  • Recommend other support resources as necessary
  • Meet with Academic Chair or instructors as needed to discuss concerns, new accommodations, etc.

  • Receive the accommodation memo from the student
  • Discuss accommodation needs with student
  • Collaborate with student and accessibility advisor on accommodations needs/changes/concerns
  • Create an inclusive learning environment for the student. This may include adopting UDL initiatives for the entire class
  • Schedule exams/labs/assignments to meet accommodations as necessary
  • If using Test Centre for examinations:
  • Initiate registration in Registration in Registerblast for examinations
  • Ensure online version of exam is provided to Test Centre in advance of the scheduled examination
  • Ensure student booking time meets instructor requirements
  • Refer student to Accessibility Services if believe student may need additional accommodations

  • Receive the accommodation memo from the Accessibility Advisor
  • Discuss any concerns related to the memo or student with Accessibility Advisor
  • Work with the student to create revised scheduling if necessary (if qualified for reduced course load)
  • Ensure classroom needs, if necessary, are met
  • May oversee accommodations with instructors
Track the academic progression of the student

The best thing to do first, is have a conversation with your instructor. They may be able to provide suggestions on how to successfully complete your work.

There are many academic supports available to you at the Lamb Learner Success Centre. We offer academic coaching and tutoring, Financial advising and of course, you can always speak to an accessibility advisor about your needs. You can also ask for assistance through our Early Alert self-referral. The service is completely confidential and can get you connected to many of the other resources available to you at SAIT. 

No. Accommodations from high school do not automatically transfer to SAIT. As a SAIT student, you need to register with Accessibility Services, complete the required intake forms, and provide medical and/or other documentation to receive accommodations. Please connect with our office as soon as you have been accepted.

Please contact Accessibility Services to schedule an appointment with an advisor. You will be provided intake forms to complete and we will ask you to provide supporting documentation.

Accessibility services can meet with you to do an initial screening. From there you may qualify for a referral for an assessment (conditions apply).

If the initial screening does not indicate a disability, the accessibility advisor can recommend other resources that may help you with your studies such as academic coaching, success seminars and available tutoring resources.

There are a number of products available to assist some of our qualifying students with disabilities in adapting to the learning environment. These too, can help to remove barriers.

If applicable or deemed required, the use of adaptive/assistive technology is often discussed during your initial meeting with an accessibility advisor. Either you will have used the technology in the past and would like to continue, or the advisor may suggest the use of technology to help remove a specific barrier. Not all students use or need to use adaptive/assistive technology.

Some examples of adaptive/assistive can be found here

Some students with disabilities require more time to process the information required for learning or for communication/writing. Providing the extra time reduces stress levels and allows you the time to properly process information or formulate responses to exam questions. It does not provide any advantage over other students, it simply levels the playing field (equity).

Please seek the advice of your accessibility advisor. There may be a valid reason for why certain accommodations cannot be implemented. Some accommodations may not work for some class/lab settings.

The role of the accessibility advisor is to work with SAIT students and faculty in negotiating the most appropriate accommodations. This is an opportunity for information sharing and collaboration.

Remember: Accommodations do not need to be perfect, but they must be reasonable and they must not affect the academic integrity of the course/program.

The role of the accessibility advisor is to work with SAIT students and faculty in negotiating the most appropriate accommodations. This is an opportunity for information sharing and collaboration. The accessibility advisor is also very experienced in determining the most appropriate accommodation to reduce barriers.

Accommodations are meant to be reasonable and do not need to be perfect or exactly as requested. cannot just be outright refused.

Not all recommendations offered in psychoeducational assessments work for post-secondary institutions. Depending on the date of the assessment, they may have been intended for secondary education and must be adapted for post-secondary. The rigor and requirements of post-secondary may not align with all recommendation and SAIT must protect the academic integrity of its programming.  Your advisor will work with you to determine the most appropriate and reasonable accommodations. 

Meeting with an advisor early ensures that you receive the most appropriate accommodation and that they are in place for the start of your studies. This will ensure you are on the right track to academic success. You must also provide a copy of your accommodation memo to your instructors, as soon as you receive it, so that they may work with you to implement your accommodations.

NO. Please show your instructor your accommodation memo as soon as you receive it and let them know your situation. Asking for accommodations late in the semester will impact your ability to receive any accommodations as Testing Services and instructors require advanced notice for booking and exam creation. at that time.

Your accommodation memo is good for a 2-year period (typical program duration at SAIT). After that time period, your memo will expire and you will need to schedule an appointment with Accessibility Services to have your memo renewed/updated, should you choose to return to SAIT.

During that 2-year period, YOU are responsible for providing a copy to each of your instructors at the BEGINNING of each term/training period. Otherwise, they will not be aware of your accommodations.

Should your accommodation needs change throughout your time at SAIT, please book an appointment to discuss with your SAIT accessibility advisor. 

Accommodations do not normally occur in a laboratory setting. There are safety standards that are quite different than that of a classroom which may result in undue hardship to the institution. The lab may also be tied to bona fide occupational requirements that prevent any accommodation.

If you are provided extra time as an accommodation, you will be provided with 1.5x the regular exam time as a standard. Students with specific cognitive disabilities should have a discussion with their accessibility advisor.

Extra time for assignments is not normally provided to students by Accessibility Services, because extending one date may impact the amount of work required all at once if there are other assignments. It also delays grades for students, making it difficult to know how they are actually doing in that course. It is important to know where you stand in a course so that you can make appropriate decisions prior to withdraw deadlines.

In all cases of students providing physician’s notes for temporary illnesses (not disability related), we suggest that you show your instructor the physician’s note so that they may view the note and record that it was received. However, you should keep that note for FOIP purposes. If you have concerns about this, please speak with your accessibility advisor.

Where possible, the instructor may request the use of the Testing Services facilities. Faculty is first required to register as an instructor with their upcoming semester exams in order for accommodated students to be able to book their exam. See “How do I book my exam?”

  1. Provide your instructor with a copy of your accommodation memo as soon as you receive it.
  2. Talk with your instructor about whether they will invigilate or use Testing Services. Note: The instructor must initiate the booking in the Registerblast system. If you have questions about the process, please contact testing@sait.ca.

To book an exam with accommodations to write in Services (MC221):

  • be enrolled in a SAIT program
  • be registered with Accessibility Services
  • have an up-to-date accommodation memo for the current semester

Submit your seat booking through the RegisterBlast student exam booking portal:

If you need assistance finalizing your RegisterBlast account or have any questions, please contact Testing Services.

Faculty/staff should discuss your accommodations with you in a private setting. However, faculty/staff may need to share some information with other staff involved in implementing the accommodation. If you have concerns, please speak with your accessibility advisor.

Please contact your accessibility advisor to discuss your concerns. They may be able to discuss the situation with your instructor to make some adjustments or they may suggest some other resources that may be more helpful.

To apply for a medically related leave/withdraw, students must start by having a conversation with their Academic Chair/Academic Advisor. Following that conversation. Please contact accessibility.services@sait.ca to complete the leave request. Medical documentation will be required.

Retroactive Medical Withdrawals are NOT permitted except under extenuating circumstances.

  • Please review 3.19.1 Student Leaves Procedure for more information.

You can begin by speaking with your accessibility advisor. They are very knowledgeable about the many SAIT resources available for you.

You can also visit Student Development and Counselling. They work to promote the well-being and success of all students through free in-person, telephone or video appointments.

SAIT now has an Ombudsperson! The ombudsperson is available to both students and staff to discuss any concerns surrounding one’s rights and options through policy and other resources. Click here for more information on the SAIT Ombudsperson.

Contact us

Accessibility Services

Lamb Learner Success Centre, MC221, Stan Grad Centre

403.774.5093 accessibility.services@sait.ca

Monday - Friday | 8 am - 4 pm

Book an appointment with accessibility services

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