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Celebrating outstanding students

From a jail cell in Cameroon, to an oil field in Pakistan to dinner with Prince Charles in Buckingham Palace, you never know where you'll end up with a SAIT education, explained Patrick Jarvis, SAIT's 2014 honorary degree recipient.

The former Paralympian was speaking at a luncheon celebrating SAIT Student Award recipients. Jarvis described his unlikely journey from SAIT grad to the world stage, and urged students to stay positive and optimistic.

"Your SAIT education gives you a foundation and credibility but your challenge is to resist being measured by others," Jarvis said. "Find what's important to you and define your own success."

Honouring donors

Approximately 600 students, donors and employees attended two luncheons over two days to celebrate award recipients from five academic schools — the MacPhail School of Energy and the Schools of Business, Construction, Manufacturing and Automation and the School of Information and Communications Technologies.

Students from each school talked about the importance of student awards and thanked donors for contributing to their success.

SAIT's new Vice President Academic Brad Donaldson also thanked donors for demonstrating their commitment to applied education.

"You know how important it is to make sure that financial worries don't stand in the way of students achieving their goals," Donaldson said. "You know how great it feels to be recognized for things like athletic or community pursuits."

Doing it for the students

During the program, a new, staff-funded student award was announced. The SAIT Family Campaign Peer Recognition Award will be presented to a first-year student in fall 2015. The award was built from funds raised through the Shout Out program, which encourages employees to celebrate each other by posting their praises on SAITNOW - the employee intranet.

SAIT provided approximately $4 million to 4,000 students this year.