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Home Alumni Alumni News CAPP president talks tough times and opportunities

CAPP president talks tough times and opportunities

The President and CEO of the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers (CAPP) appealed to SAIT students Friday, March 4, encouraging them to engage in national dialogue around the oil and gas sector.

During his speaking engagement on campus, Tim McMillan told SAIT School of Construction students that every aspect of the Canadian economy has threads running through the industry.

Watch: CAPP president

"This year, the oil and gas sector will invest $40 billion into the Canadian economy and a lot of that will go into the construction sector," says McMillan. "It's still the largest investment in our economy, and it remains the most important industry in Canada."

McMillan hopes to see more students using their technical skills and social media savvy to get involved in conversations about Canadian energy.

"We can't control the oil prices and we shouldn't let that get in the way of being more efficient and effective," says McMillan. "For too long we didn't engage in the debate about the oil and gas sector. We let others do that on our behalf, and those driving the narrative weren't our supporters. This is too important to allow outside forces to dictate our destiny. We need to define our own destiny."

Dean of the School of Construction, Scott MacPherson, says it's important for students to hear directly from industry.

"These connections with industry are critical to our students' success," says MacPherson. "Tim McMillan's insight into the energy industry and upcoming trends comes not only from personal experience, but from some of the most informed sources in the country. His remarks are providing our students with insider knowledge they can carry into their studies and future careers."

McMillan's talk with students is part of the School of Construction's Distinguished Speaker Series. He said he hoped speaking to the students would provide them with a realistic and promising view of their futures.

"We've been through this before," he says. "Historically we come out stronger than we went in."